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A&E Updates: ‘Bachelorette’ in Laurel Highlands; Tengger Cavalry to play Belvedere’s; Stage Right to present &… | TribLIVE.com
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A&E Updates: ‘Bachelorette’ in Laurel Highlands; Tengger Cavalry to play Belvedere’s; Stage Right to present &…

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Add the Laurel Highlands to the list of exotic locations that ABC’s “The Bachelorette” has taken her dates. In the episode airing at 7 p.m. June 7, Bachelorette Joelle “JoJo” Fletcher and one of her suitors will be shown visiting well-known area attractions, including Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Fayette County and Greensburg’s Palace Theatre and Supper Club.

Add the Laurel Highlands to the list of exotic locations that ABC’s “The Bachelorette” has taken her dates.

In the episode airing at 7 p.m. June 7, Bachelorette Joelle “JoJo” Fletcher and one of her suitors will be shown visiting well-known area attractions, including Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Fayette County and Greensburg’s Palace Theatre and Supper Club.

“Dan + Shay, the country group, performed a private concert in the Palace as part of the one-on-one date,” said Jennifer Benford, marketing manager for Westmoreland Cultural Trust, which owns the theater.

The duo’s Dan Smyers grew up in Wexford and attended Carnegie Mellon University.

— Shirley McMarlin

For a lot of metal bands, the death-or-glory swords-and-plunder mythos of the Vikings has proved irresistible subject matter, for obvious reasons. There’s even entire genres of “Viking metal” (like Amon Amarth) and “folk metal” (like Finntroll, Korpiklaani, who do some traditional folk instrumentation).

So perhaps it was inevitable that the legendary nomadic hordes of the Mongolian steppe would be next. Tengger Cavalry is a Mongolian/Chinese “Nomadic folk metal” band, inspired by warrior tradition and shamanic religion, with songs about horse-bound warriors, riding and conquering. They use fiddle and throat-singing — a low, rumbling unearthly style of overtone-singing that’s indigenous to the area — and are equally adept at playing metal, folk music and even ambient New Age music.

They’ll be performing June 3 at Belvedere’s in Lawrenceville, the first major show at the venue after it was closed by a fire. It’s being billed as an “unofficial Ai Weiwei afterparty”— the celebrated dissident Chinese artist has exhibitions at the Andy Warhol Museum and Carnegie Museum of Art — for those interested in discovering a different aspect of Chinese art and culture. The show starts at 10 p.m. with Tartarus opening, and tickets are $10. Details: 412-687-2555 or belvederesultradive.com

— Michael Machosky

Stage Right’s student company will present Green Day’s Tony Award-winning Broadway musical “American Idiot” at 8:30 p.m. June 3 and 4 and 2 p.m. June 5 in the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, 951 Old Salem Road.

More than 40 teen actors will stage the show based in part on Green Day frontman Billie Joe Armstrong’s battle with drug use and adapted from the group’s 2004 concept album.

Representatives of Sage’s Army, a nonprofit drug-use awareness and prevention organization, will be on hand to discuss the dangers of addiction.

Stage Right’s preteen students will perform the musical comedy “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” another Tony Award-winner, about a small-town girl seeking success in New York City in 1922, at 6 p.m. June 3 and 2 and 6 p.m. June 4.

All tickets are $10.

Details: 724-832-7464 or stagerightgreensburg.com

— Shirley McMarlin

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