Archive

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is thrilled about her ‘Veep’ return | TribLIVE.com
Celebrity News

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is thrilled about her ‘Veep’ return

194771gtrlivdreyfus090518
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
In this Sept. 17, 2017, file photo, Julia Louis-Dreyfus arrives at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles.

NEW YORK (AP) — Julia Louis-Dreyfus is back at work on “Veep” and said it feels “fantastic.”

The star of the HBO comedy series revealed last September that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The news came soon after her sixth consecutive Emmy win for the role of Selina Meyer.

As work began recently on the show’s seventh and final season, Louis-Dreyfus told The Associated Press: “I feel good. I feel strong. I’ve got energy and, yeah, back to my old tricks. It feels like I never left.”

The “Seinfeld” alum has signed on to her first cancer awareness initiative, helping Carolina Herrera designer Wes Gordon design a flower-adorned T-shirt as part of Saks Fifth Avenue’s 20th year raising money through its Key to the Cure program.

The limited-edition shirt will sell for $35 at Saks stores Oct. 1-31, with 100 percent of proceeds passed to the AiRS Foundation, a nonprofit Louis-Dreyfus supports for its work in helping women with the costs of breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

“Up to 70 percent of breast cancer survivors who have had a mastectomy are really unsure or unaware of their reconstruction options, and many of those women who desire to have surgery don’t have sufficient insurance or other resources to cover it,” Louis-Dreyfus said by phone on a recent location day for “Veep.”

As a survivor, she said she’s often asked to help out. This is the first time she has said yes.

“It’s hard to say no but I’ve just had to be very careful about managing my time and conserving my energy, so you know I’m putting my whole self into Key to the Cure,” Louis-Dreyfus said. “You can’t spread yourself too thin. That’s why I wanted to choose the organization wisely and carefully.”

As this year’s ambassador for the program, Louis-Dreyfus said she wanted a bold statement for the annual T-shirt. It features three poppies and the slogan: “We are fighters & we are fighting for a cure.”

Over 20 years, Key to the Cure has donated nearly $40 million to cancer research and treatment organizations.

“It was a super-fun endeavor,” Louis-Dreyfus said of the T-shirt design process. She has often worn Herrera designs on red carpets. The shirt features blooms in jewel-tone red and pink.

“I wanted it to have a sort of femininity and a powerful message at the same time because I believe the two can go hand in hand,” she said. “I liked the idea of talking about fighting.”

Leanne Italie is an Associated Press writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.