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Night at the museums: Adults get to play at Pittsburgh’s cultural spots | TribLIVE.com
Art & Museums

Night at the museums: Adults get to play at Pittsburgh’s cultural spots

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, September 24, 2014 9:12 p.m
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Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
Monica Lennon, (left) Javier Figueroa and Nesha Sellers all of New York City enjoy a drink at one of the Good Friday events for the Andy Warhol Museum, Friday, Aug. 22, 2014.
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Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
Bridgette Luttner, Erin Szymanski and Nicole Jarock (l-r) enjoy happy hour at the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
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Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
Javier Figueroa and Nesha Sellers of New York City enjoy one of the Good Friday events for the Andy Warhol Museum, Friday, Aug. 22, 2014.
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Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
A group of enjoys drinks at one of the Good Friday events for the Andy Warhol Museum, Friday, Aug. 22, 2014.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
University of Pittsburgh grad students Stanton Kochanek, of Mt. Lebanon, and Maeve Maloney, of Cincinnati, Ohio, dance during the Party in the Tropics event at the Phipps Conservatory on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
Elena Mesa, left, of Fox Chapel, and Gena Wodnicki, middle, of Squirrel Hill, speak with artist Sebastian Errazuriz during the opening party for his exhibition at the Carnegie Museum of Art on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
Casey Helfrich, left, of Friendship, attends an opening party for artist Sebastian Errazuriz's exhibition at the Carnegie Museum of Art on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
Becky Jadlocki, left, of Irwin, and her daughter Heather Duckett, of New Kensington, share a moment during the Party in the Tropics event at the Phipps Conservatory on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014.
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Carnegie Science Center
Adults play during 21+ Night at the Carnegie Science Center, North Shore.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
A man walks through the doors of the rainforest exhibit as night falls during the National Aviary at Night event for adults at the North Side attraction on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Every third Thursday, the 21-and-up crowd is invited to the Aviary to bird watch during the evening for half-price of the regular admission cost.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Katelyn Pontore (left), 25, of Shaler and Greg Fakelmann, 25, of North Side, talk as they walk with their cocktails during the National Aviary at Night event for adults at the North Side attraction on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Every third Thursday, the 21-and-up crowd is invited to the Aviary to bird watch during the evening for half-price of the regular admission cost.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Lauren Izatt (left), 29, of San Diego, CA and James Izatt, 23, of Murraysville look at birds during the National Aviary at Night event for adults at the North Side attraction on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Every third Thursday, the 21-and-up crowd is invited to the Aviary to bird watch during the evening for half-price of the regular admission cost.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Chai Ling (center), 30, of East End, shares a laugh with her fellow pharmacy residents during the National Aviary at Night event for adults at the North Side attraction on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Every third Thursday, the 21-and-up crowd is invited to the Aviary to bird watch during the evening for half-price of the regular admission cost.
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Carnegie Library
Guests attend an adults-only event at the Carnegie Library in Oakland.
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Carnegie Library
Guests attend an adults-only event at the Carnegie Library in Oakland.
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Carnegie Library
Guests attend an adults-only event at the Carnegie Library in Oakland.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left), Long-time Art on Tap patron, Barbara Ferrier, of Greensburg, talks with Westmoreland Museum of American Art's Maureen Zang, Public Programs Coordinator, and Charlene Bidula, Manager of Communications and New Media, during Art on Tap 5.2.7, held at Westmoreland @rt 30 in Greensburg on Friday evening, September 12, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from right), Bill McGarrity, of Latrobe, and Joanna Stillwagon, of Greensburg, look at art in the Pop-Up exhibit, while others mingle over cocktails, during Art on Tap 5.2.7, held at Westmoreland @rt 30 in Greensburg on Friday evening, September 12, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(front, from left), Aubrey DeStephen, of Irwin, mingles over cocktails, music and art, with Tanya and Tom Gaudino, also of Irwin, during Art on Tap 5.2.7, held at Westmoreland @rt 30 in Greensburg on Friday evening, September 12, 2014.
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Nathan J Shaulis | Porter Loves Photography
Adult patrons take part in a recent 21+ Night at Carnegie Science Center on the North Shore.
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Carnegie Science Center
Adult patrons take part in a recent 21+ Night at Carnegie Science Center on the North Shore.
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Nathan J Shaulis | Porter Loves Photography
Adult patrons take part in a recent 21+ Night at Carnegie Science Center on the North Shore.

If you’ve ever taken a child to one of Pittsburgh’s many cultural spots, you know how tempting some of those cool exhibits can be. But who says those kid-centric spots have to be just for the younger set? Adults deserve some childlike fun, too.

Carnegie Science Center‘s 21+ Night

It’s always a little frustrating for an adult to be surrounded by kids at the Carnegie Science Center.

“Everyone knows adults would like to play air hockey against the robot, too,” says Zachary Weber, education coordinator of adult programs at the North Shore site. “But it’s a little rude to push the kids out of the way.”

For that reason, the center has its 21+ Night. At the events, which run from 6 to 10 p.m. at the North Shore site, all three floors of the center are open only to adults, who can take advantage of cash bars on each level.

The 21+ Nights started in 2012, he says, as a way of luring adults who were more used to being chaperones than visitors. Now, the evenings are offered on one Friday evening every month but July.

Planners were hoping for about 100 people the first evening, but drew more than 300, Weber says. Now, gatherings average about 1,000 per event.

He says it’s always fun to see the adults playing the Sounds of Science game, where they try to identify squeaks and booms, or to see them put on uniforms of Imperial Stormtroopers.

Weber says the staff tries to build the 21+ Nights around themes. The Sept. 26 theme will be “Starry Nights” and will feature members of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh directing gazes into the night.

Oct. 31 will be sponsored by Wigle Whiskey from the Strip District and deal with spirits of the ghostly and alcoholic kind. Members of the Pittsburgh Glass Center will take a look at glass and its history Nov. 14.

To add another adult attraction, the nearby Rivers Casino offers $15 in free slot play to visitors — which, of course, lets you deal with the science of good luck.

The 21+ Night is $15, $10 in advance. Details: 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org

— Bob Karlovits

Party in the Tropics

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens has a hot spot for anyone seeking a fun-filled evening in an exotic environment. Party in the Tropics is held at the conservatory in Oakland from 7 to 11 p.m. on select Fridays for guests age 21 and older.

The event draws from 250 to 500 guests each month, Phipps spokeswoman Liz Fetchin says.

The Tropical Forest Conservatory, with its gorgeous greenery, waterfalls and plants, transforms into a nightspot where guests can enjoy treats and cocktails and boogie down to a DJ-provided soundtrack.

Upcoming Party in the Tropics dates are Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5. The cost, which includes Phipps admission, is $15.

Details: 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

— Rachel Weaver

After Hours @ the Library!

Libraries are supposed to be quiet. Everybody knows this.

Yet, a few times a year, at a few of the Carnegie Library branches, this rule is flouted. “After Hours @ the Library!” is a chance for the library to let its hair down, and raise its voice above a whisper.

It’s definitely for grown-ups (21 and older), though, so leave the little screamers at home.

The next “After Hours” event, titled “Cirque,” will be Oct. 17 and feature a circus theme. There will be food, beer and wine, music from local bands, tarot readings and “spirit drawings,” mask-making and “elegant face art,” airbrush tattoos, and a silent auction for library furniture. Plus, it will benefit the Carnegie Library system.

Food and drink will come from Full Pint Brewing, Marty’s Market (a grocer and cafe in the Strip), the Pub Chip Shop (Scottish and British food, South Side), Wigle Whiskey, Round Corner Cantina (Mexican food, Lawrenceville), and Greek Gourmet (Greek deli, Squirrel Hill).

“After Hours” will start at 7 p.m. at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s main branch in Oakland. Tickets are $45, which includes three drink tickets and hors d’ouvres, until Oct. 13, and $55 afterward.

Details: 412-622-3114 or carnegielibrary.org

— Michael Machosky

Good Fridays at the Andy Warhol Museum

Every Friday is a Good Friday at the Andy Warhol Museum on the North Side.

After your workweek is through, take advantage of the half-off admission and sit back with a drink at the cash bar in the first-floor lobby and snap some selfies on the couch below a photo of Warhol on that same piece of furniture. Guests can explore the exhibits from 5 to 10 p.m.

But that’s not the only adult-geared happening at the Warhol.

The museum’s Sound Series features international, national and local artists that blur genres and the sensibilities of contemporary independent music. The Warhol Theater provides an intimate setting for these adult-oriented concerts.

The next Sound Series will be at 8 p.m. Oct. 3. It will feature Pittsburgh-based trio Andre Costello and the Coal Minors marking their debut release on Wild Kindness Records. Admission is $10, $8 for students.

Details: 412-237-8300 or warhol.org

— JoAnne Klimovich Harrop

National Aviary at Night

If you want to see the birds at the National Aviary without all that high-pitched squawking and squealing (we’re talking about the kids here), the National Aviary at Night event is for you.

Designed for guests 21 and older, the events are the third Thursday of each month.

Visitors to the North Side aviary’s Night events — often 20-something professionals or older couples on a date night — can explore all the exhibits and maybe even meet a penguin.

“It just gives you a really different perspective on the aviary,” says aviary spokeswoman Laura Smith.

With music playing in the background, attendees can take part in a “chill vibe” with an open-eating area where you can grab something to eat from Atria’s Kookaburra Cafe and drinks from a cash bar.

National Aviary at Night events run from 5 to 9 p.m., and guests get half-price admission for $7. Bring in a receipt from a North Side restaurant, and you get an extra $2 off.

The next event, Oct. 16, features free admission from UPMC Health Plan. Details: 412-323-7235 or aviary.org

— Kellie B. Gormly

Westmoreland @rt 30 Art on Tap

A happy hour is a happy hour — unless it’s Art on Tap 5.2.7, held from 5 to 7 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Westmoreland @rt 30 in Unity.

“This is a happy hour that embraces art and art appreciation,” says Judith O’Toole, director and CEO of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, currently operating at the Unity location while the Greensburg facility undergoes a major renovation and expansion. “It’s been an amazing success, surpassing our highest goals.”

Art on Tap began in November 2010 as a way to engage a younger generation of potential museum visitors and supporters.

For $7, attendees get two tickets for beer or wine and a variety of light bites from a local restaurant. Live local music is featured, along with an art scavenger hunt with art- and museum-related prizes. Admission is $5 for those who prefer soft drinks.

Some months also serve as opening receptions for the museum’s series of Pop-Up Exhibitions.

Each installment boasts a different corporate or nonprofit sponsor, O’Toole says, making the event a dual outreach to the community.

Attendance averages about 200, with a high of more than 300, according to Claire Ertl, the museum’s marketing and public relations director.

“We see the traditional age group of museum supporters, and I’ve definitely noticed a strong representation of people in their late 20s and early 30s,” Ertl says. “The fact that everybody feels welcome is what makes it great.”

Details: 724-837-1500 or wmuseumaa.org

— Shirley McMarlin

Categories: Museums
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