Archive

ShareThis Page
Out & About: 2018 was a year of numerous noteworthy events | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: 2018 was a year of numerous noteworthy events

Shirley McMarlin
580017gtrOAGLSDart3110518
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Greater Latrobe Senior High School student council members (from left) Gianna Ferry, Alex Bisignani, Noah Belak and Landrey Quinn at the Greater Latrobe School District Art Conservation Trust art gala, held Nov. 1 in Greater Latrobe Senior High School.Greater Latrobe Senior High School members of student council, (from left), Gianna Ferry, Alex Bisignani, Noah Belak and Landrey Quinn, gather for a photo during the Greater Latrobe School District Art Conservation Trust art gala, held at the Greater Latrobe Senior High School on Nov. 1, 2018.
580017gtrOAtopfivearts123118
From left: Westmoreland Cultural Trust special events coordinator Kelli Brisbane with award presenters, Judges Jim Silvis and Meagan Bilik-DeFazio, at the Trust’s 20th Annual Achievement in the Arts Awards, held May 20 at The Palace Theatre in Greensburg.(From left) Westmoreland Cultural Trust events manager Kelli Brisbane with award presenters, Judges Jim Silvis and Meagan Bilik-DeFazio, at the Trust’s 20th Annual Achievement in the Arts Awards on May 20 at Greensburg’s Palace Theatre.
580017gtrOAtopfivedance123118
(from front), Izzy Valone, 6, of Acme, and Aubree Nelson, 10, of Norvelt, lead a dance train during the 'Me and My Special Guy Dance', hosted by the American Cancer Society Relay for Life of Mt. Pleasant, held at the Roosevelt Hall in Mt. Pleasant Township on Saturday afternoon, February 10, 2018. Aubrey Nelson, 10, of Norvelt (left) and Izzy Valone, 6, of Acme lead a dance train during the Me and My Special Guy Dance hosted by the American Cancer Society Relay for Life of Mt. Pleasant on Feb. 10 in Roosevelt Hall in Norvelt.
580017gtrOAtopfivepink123118
Bailey DeTesta models a selection from Miller’s Prom & Formal Wear, during the Westmoreland Walks, 'Passionately Pink', fashion show, held at the Bishop Connare Center near Greensburg on Saturday afternoon, May 5, 2018. Bailey DeTesta models a selection from Miller’s Prom & Formal Wear during the inaugural Westmoreland Walks Passionately Pink fashion show on May 5.
580017gtrOAtopfivegiving123118
(from left), Rebecca Stas and Kyle Gundy admire the art, during the opening reception for 'The Art of Giving: Selections from the Richard M. Scaife Bequest', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, May 12, 2018.Rebecca Stas (left) and Kyle Gundy admire the art during the opening reception for “The Art of Giving: Selections from the Richard M. Scaife Bequest,” on May 12 in The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

In their acceptance speeches, award-winners often thank a list of people “too numerous to mention.”

So it was with the list of intriguing and influential events covered by Out & About in 2018. All deserve an extra, end-of-the-year salute — which, sadly, space does not allow.

Here are five that had wide-ranging effects for many people in Westmoreland County and beyond.

Me and My Special
Guy — Feb. 10

The population of tiny Norvelt almost doubled Feb. 10 as young ladies and their dates flocked to Roosevelt Hall for a Me and My Special Guy Dance .

The third annual event, hosted by the American Cancer Society Mt. Pleasant Relay for Life team, was sold out at
350 guests for both afternoon and evening sessions.

ACS staffer Dawn Keefer said many would-be guests were turned away when singles sessions offered in the first two years quickly sold out. Organizers decided to double the fun this year, which paid off in a big way.

Dads, granddads, uncles, big brothers and other special guys came to share pizza and pop, games, crafts, photo ops and — of course — dancing with their special girls. A basket auction offered anything a little miss would need for a sleepover, movie night, playtime, arts and crafts, pampering and more.

Passionately Pink — May 5

Sponsoring a new fundraising event is a risk: will enough people turn out to make it a success?

Westmoreland Walks board members, led by Kathy Brown and Cheryl McMullen , got a resounding “yes” to that question with their inaugural Passionately Pink luncheon and fashion show, held May 5 at the Christ, Our Shepherd Center (former Bishop Connare Center) in Unity.

They couldn’t go wrong with a tasty luncheon buffet and a peek at new warm weather fashions, courtesy of The Post and Rail Men’s Shop and Betsy’s, both in Ligonier; Crossroads Boutique & Cattiva, Descendants and Miller’s Prom and Formal Wear, all in Greensburg; Simplicity Boutique in Murrysville, and Cabi, an online store.

A good cause helps too.

The group raises funds for the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition, sponsors an annual Spa Serenity Day for Westmoreland County women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and gives a Pink Ribbon Scholarship to a graduating senior in the county whose life and/or family has been affected by breast cancer.

“The Art of Giving” — May 12

“Of all the money I’ve donated or spent, the most enduring pleasure and reward came from buying art.”

That quote was included with artworks featured in “ The Art of Giving: Selections from the Richard M. Scaife Bequest,” a 2018 exhibition in The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

“I’m very happy with it,” said The Westmoreland’s chief curator Barbara Jones at a May 12 opening reception. “I think it’s very beautiful.”

The late Tribune-Review publisher donated his vast American art collection to The Westmoreland and the Brandywine River Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, Delaware County. The collection contained approximately 500 works.

The exhibition featured the first
25 pieces each museum chose from that collection, which were divided up in a 2014 round-robin selection process.

Judy O’Toole , The Westmoreland’s former Richard M. Scaife Director/CEO, called the bequest “a remarkable honor” for the two institutions, significantly increasing their holdings — and undoubtedly, their stature among the nation’s museums.

Achievement in the Arts — May 20

As a center for all kinds of artistic endeavors, Greensburg’s Palace Theatre provided the perfect setting May 20 for the Westmoreland Cultural Trust’s 20th Annual Achievement in the Arts Awards Celebration .

The program recognizes students from area high schools who have distinguished themselves in the areas of music, theater and visual arts. Awardees are selected by faculty members and advisers at their respective schools.

Previous programs have featured a sit-down dinner, but this year the format was changed to accommodate a larger number of guests, said Kelli Brisbane , the Trust’s event manager.

The theater’s intermission suite and patio provided ample room for honorees, parents, grandparents, siblings, friends and others to mingle at a reception, while the theater’s 1,369 seats were sufficient for those who came to watch the onstage program in which students received commemorative pins and pens from Westmoreland County Judges Meagan Bilik-DeFazio
and Jim Silvis .

Greater Latrobe Art Gala — Nov. 1

On Nov. 1, the Greater Latrobe School District Art Conservation Trust hosted its annual Art Gala to reveal works by 19 area artists that students voted on to be considered for the district’s special art collection.

From two pieces purchased in 1936, the collection has grown to about 200 works that line the high school halls.

Student docents chose the featured works from pieces included in juried exhibitions at the Latrobe Art Center, Greensburg Art Center and the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley.

The 500 gala guests had the opportunity to vote for their favorites, just as a comparison to the student picks. They agreed with the students on four of five pieces.

Special guest for the evening was Corinne Bollinger , 100, who graduated from Latrobe the year the collection was established.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter @shirley_trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.