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Hanna’s Town celebrates ‘Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate’ | TribLIVE.com
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Hanna’s Town celebrates ‘Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate’

by DAWN LAW
| Sunday, November 23, 2014 7:13 p.m.
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Rebecca Emanuele | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left) Deborah Stiffler-Zugates of Blairsville, Tiffany Kolbosky of Manor, and Joanna Moyar of Greensburg, portray servers in an 18th Century coffee house, during the 'Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate in America', program and sampling session held at Historic Hanna's Town, Saturday morning, November 22, 2014.
gtrOAhannastown2112414
Rebecca Emanuele | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left) Deborah Stiffler-Zugates of Blairsville, gives instruction to guest, Marcia Linden of Greensburg, on how to grind roasted coffee beans in a mortar and pestle in preparation for cooking fresh coffee, during the 'Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate in America', program and sampling session held at Historic Hanna's Town, Saturday morning, November 22, 2014.
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Rebecca Emanuele | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(center) Lisa Hays, executive director, Westmoreland County Historical Society, gives presentation to guests on how chocolate and coffee became popular in America, during the 'Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate in America', program and sampling session held at Historic Hanna's Town, Saturday morning, November 22, 2014.

Historic Hanna’s Town in Hempfield took guests back in time Nov. 22 for the program “Three Centuries of Coffee and Chocolate in America.”

Hanna’s Tavern was an 18th-century coffeehouse, where volunteers Debbie Stiffler-Zugates and Tiffany Kolbosky served cracknel, a thin, savory biscuit flavored with caraway seeds, Chelsea buns, hot chocolate, and fresh roasted coffee.

Representing the 19th century in the Klingensmith House, Carol Sheats served salmagundi, a salad layered with meat, cheese, eggs, greens and vegetables topped with vinaigrette.

Coffee was provided by Kandi Newell andDavid Cramer of Old Linn Run Coffee Bean Roastery.

In the Museum Shop, it was the 20th century, with Eight O’clock Coffee, desserts and shopping.

Westmoreland County Historical Society executive director Lisa Hays, education coordinator Joanna Moyar and library coordinatorAnita Zanke were there to help throughout, along with Claudia Winter, Becky Perry, Pauline Moyar, Marilyn McSparrin, Janice Bucci, Joan DeRose, Augie Nicolai, Jeanne DeMaria and Joyce Delpaine.

Seen: Martin Keck, Eli Person and Lisa Zack, Denise Rymarz, Jane Peterson, Rudy and Amy Kobosky and Jim andNancy Komarinski.

— Dawn Law

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