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Public invited to tour and cast votes for decorated trees in Mt. Pleasant

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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left), Debbie Hartz, of Mt. Pleasant, and her sister, Linda Darr, of Friendens, Somerset County, admire the decorated trees at the annual Festival of Lights, held at the Samuel Warden Mansion in Mt. Pleasant on Saturday afternoon, November 29, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
A tree decorated with teapots, 'Christmas Afternoon Tea', was one of the displayed trees at the annual Festival of Lights, held at the Samuel Warden Mansion in Mt. Pleasant on Saturday afternoon, November 29, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
Members of the Braddock Trail Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, (from left), Peggy Shepler and Ester Reese, volunteer at the annual Festival of Lights, held at the Samuel Warden Mansion in Mt. Pleasant on Saturday afternoon, November 29, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
A wintry decorated tree called, 'Fun in the Snow', was one of the displayed trees at the annual Festival of Lights, held at the Samuel Warden Mansion in Mt. Pleasant on Saturday afternoon, November 29, 2014.
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Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left), Charlene Saloom, of Mt. Pleasant, admires decorated trees with her sons, Thaddeus George, 7, and Alexander George, 4, during the annual Festival of Lights, held at the Samuel Warden Mansion in Mt. Pleasant on Saturday afternoon, November 29, 2014.

It’s the 25th year for the Braddock Trail Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution Festival of Lights.

Situated at 200 South Church St. in Mt. Pleasant, the DAR’s headquarters is housed in a lovely 1886 Victorian-style mansion built for Samuel and Margaret Warden.

Lights glow cheerily in the windows, in a garland over the door and on displays throughout. Upstairs and down twinkle with trees decorated and donated by businesses and individuals.

The items will be raffled, and some are available for purchase. The ingenuity in their creation never fails to amaze event chairwoman Roz Ashmun. “There isn’t a tree here that I don’t like; we never have two trees that look the same,” she said during the gala opening Nov. 28.

This year, there are trees representing “Frozen,” Mardi Gras and the South Pacific. Others use tiny hats, seashells, snowflakes and blue and pink color schemes. There’s even a village, complete with churches and a railroad station lit by tiny lights, created by Debbie Massafra.

The house will be open for public viewing from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 4; 1:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 5 and Dec. 6; and noon to 4 p.m. Dec. 7.

Donations are $5 per person; admission is free for age 12 and younger; and everyone gets to vote for their favorite.

Seen: Debra Newill, Joyce Florek, Dolly Queer, Ann Roller, Becky Cole, Traci Myers, Nancy Wood, Sue Hoke, Peg Hunter, Fran Vas, Mary Burket and her daughter, Susie Burket.

— Dawn Law

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