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Apple Hill Playhouse’s production of ‘Cool Suit’ is a classic children’s tale with updated music | TribLIVE.com
Theater & Arts

Apple Hill Playhouse’s production of ‘Cool Suit’ is a classic children’s tale with updated music

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Cast members (standing from left ) Megan Swift of Murrysville, Shea Miller of Murrysville, Amanda Parente of Plum, Daniel Young of Harrison City, Kevin Adamik of Tarentum,Julia Novak of Murrysville, Olivia Lantz of Greensburg, Maria Bruno of Apollo, Stephen Young of Harrison City, (kneeling from left) Lexi Valenta of Jeannette and Eli Koch of Murrysville rehearse for the Apple Hill Playhouse upcoming production of 'Cool Suit' on Wednesday evening, June 13, 2012 at the American Legion in Delmont, PA. Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune Review
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Cast members (from left) Amanda Parente of Plum, Shea Miller of Murrysville, Eli Koch of Murrysville, Megan Swift of Murrysville, Kevin Adamik of Tarentum, Olivia Lantz of Greensburg, Lexi Valenta of Jeannette, Julia Novak of Murrysville, Maria Bruno of Apollo and Daniel Young of Harrison City rehearse for the Apple Hill Playhouse upcoming production of 'Cool Suit' on Wednesday evening, June 13, 2012 at the American Legion in Delmont, PA. Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune Review

“The Emperor’s New Clothes” gets a fashionable makeover in an updated version of the classic children’s story being staged by Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre at Apple Hill Playhouse.

“Cool Suit,” which will open Tuesday, presents the same story as the Hans Christian Andersen tale about the pompous monarch who was promised a new suit of clothes that was better than any other. Unfortunately, he was dealing with an unreliable tailor, and the apparel turns out to be much less than the emperor expects.

In this musical version by Lauren Mayer, a score featuring rap music and tunes that resemble familiar pop songs will keep young audiences entertained, director Meghan O’Halloran says. But even those who are older than the elementary school set should have a good time.

“This show is written for a young audience, with small elements that won’t leave the adult audience wishing they had the sitter bring their kids,” the director says. “The rap song is played up a bit in the beginning of the show to get the energy of the audience — and cast — up to speed for the rest of the performance. The rap is very ‘Fresh Prince-esque,’ which should appeal to the 20-somethings in the house.”

O’Halloran says youngsters performing in the show are enjoying the experience, learning a variety of musical numbers and accompanying dance moves for every song, even if they aren’t in some of the scenes.

Kevin Adamik, a vocal performance major at Slippery Rock University who portrays the emperor, says the production gives him an opportunity to hone his acting skills. His singing experience includes a recent performance with his university’s tour choir at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

“Every chance to get on stage is a great opportunity and a great experience for me,” he says.

Maria Bruno, a senior costume-design major at Point Park University, is playing her first bad-guy role as the tailor in “Cool Suit.”

“I have never played a villain before, so it is quite a fun challenge for me,” she says.

The cast also includes Stephen Young, narrator; Olivia Lantz, mother; Megan Swift, page, and an ensemble of six children.

Candy Williams is a freelance writer.

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