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Hoofers hit the Palace on ‘World of Dance Live!’ tour | TribLIVE.com
Theater & Arts

Hoofers hit the Palace on ‘World of Dance Live!’ tour

Tribune-Review
| Thursday, September 27, 2018 12:03 a.m

So how do dancers who won over the judges during Season 2 of NBC-TV’s “World of Dance” — which only ended Sept. 12 — relax after a grueling competition?

The short answer: They don’t relax, they go on tour.

Greensburg’s The Palace Theatre is the second stop of the “World of Dance Live!” tour, a showcase of the “World of Dance” summer reality dance competition series that featured celebrity judges and professional dancers Derek Hough, NeYo and Jennifer Lopez with Jenna Dewan serving as host and mentor.

The 29-city tour of the United States and Canada kicks off Oct. 1 in Toronto and ends in Edmonton on Nov. 14. Their performance at The Palace is at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 3.

Showcase of styles

Samantha Schwartz, event and tour director of “World of Dance Live!,” said the 90-minute stage show consists of original group numbers, some group collaborations and some pieces the audience may recognize from TV.

She agreed with Hough, who called “World of Dance” the Olympics of competitive dance.

“This is a unique competition that allows dancers of all genres, group sizes and genders to compete for the same title of world’s best dancer,” Schwartz said. “It is unlike any other competition in that, regardless of your training, background and age, you compete with dancers around the world for one prize.”

In the competition, dancers are scored in five categories: performance, technique, choreography, creativity and presentation.

The hip-hop group, The Lab, comprised of dancers ages 8 to 16 from Covina, Calif., won the $1 million prize in the Series 2 final competition.

Stars of the show

Featured performers on the tour include:

• Michael Dameski, contemporary dancer from Sydney, Australia.

• Charity and Andres, contemporary dancers from Springville, Utah.

• BDash and Konkrete, krump street dancers from Los Angeles, Calif.

• Jaxon Willard, contemporary dancer from American Fork, Utah.

• Embodiment and Royal Flux, both contemporary groups from Los Angeles.

Willard placed third in the Juniors Division, Charity and Andres won the Juniors division and finished third, and Michael Dameski won the Upper Division and finished second overall.

Dameski also had the title role in the musical “Billy Elliot” on Broadway in 2008 and won the “So You Think You Can Dance” competition in Australia.

Charity Anderson and Andres Penate (Charity and Andres) have been dancing together since they were eight years old as ballroom dance partners. Their mothers both own dance studios less than 20 miles from each other.

“World of Dance” has been renewed by NBC for a third season, according to Variety.

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.


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Royal Flux, a contemporary dance group from Los Angeles, Calif., will perform in “World of Dance Live!” on Oct. 3 at The Palace Theatre, Greensburg.
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Embodiment, a contemporary dance group from Los Angeles, Calif., will perform in “World of Dance Live!” on Oct. 3 at The Palace Theatre, Greensburg.
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BDash and Konkrete, krump street dancers from Los Angeles, Calif., are part of the cast of “World of Dance Live!” on Oct. 3 at The Palace Theatre, Greensburg.
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Michael Dameski, a contemporary dancer from Sydney, Australia, will perform in “World of Dance Live!” on Oct. 3 at The Palace Theatre, Greensburg.
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