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Macaron Bar opening sweet shop in East Liberty | TribLIVE.com
Food & Drink

Macaron Bar opening sweet shop in East Liberty

Steven Adams
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Macaron Bar

This confectionary shop will sell you sweet treats but also show you how to make them at home.

The latest Macaron Bar location will be a retail store peddling the meringue-encased delights in more than a dozen flavors that change with the seasons.

But their team will also host classes for those of you interesting in replicating the mini sugar sandwiches in your own kitchen.

“They are really technical,” co-owner Michael Shem Wagner tells Next Pittsburgh . “You have to take into account humidity and temperature and under-whipping and over-whipping. It’s a challenge but the class is a fun way to learn.”

Macaron Bar started four years ago in Cincinnati and has since opened locations in Indianapolis and Louisville.

You may have noticed their test store in Ross Park Mall recently.

The new Pittsburgh shop will be in the historic Liberty Bank Building on Penn Avenue.

The menu will not be limited to macarons. Ice cream sandwiches filled with Millie’s Homemade Ice Cream will also be available.

Wash down these treats with a beverage from Lancaster-based Passenger Coffee’s on-site coffee bar.

Current Macaron Bar flavors

Birthday Cake

Black Raspberry Chocolate

Chocolate Strawberry

Toasted Coconut

Coffee

Dark Chocolate

Earl Grey Tea

Pistachio

Red Velvet

Salted Caramel

Madagascar Vanilla

Lemon Lavender

Salted Chocolate Bourbon

Hazelnut Praline

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