Archive

ShareThis Page
Out & About: Westmoreland Museum of American Art presents ‘Timeless Perfection” | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: Westmoreland Museum of American Art presents ‘Timeless Perfection”

gtrOAthewestmoreland2100917
Phil Wilson | For the Tribune-Review
Guests David Genter, left and his wife Anne join Dr. Michael L. Nieland and his wife Lilli Nieland at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. The museum hosted the opening of “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit”
gtrOAthewestmoreland3100917
Phil Wilson | For the Tribune-Review
LuLu Lippincott,Curator with the Carnegie Museum of Art, center, talks with guests at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. The museum hosted the opening of “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit”
gtrOAthewestmoreland5100917
Phil Wilson | For the Tribune-Review
Surrounded by the work of sculptor Walter Kirtland Hancock: Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s Chief Curator Barbara Jones, left, and Debra Force of New York’s Force Art gallery. the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg hosted the opening of “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit”
gtrOAthewestmoreland1100917
Phil Wilson | For the Tribune-Review
Guests relax on the veranda of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. The museum hosted the opening of “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit”
gtrOAthewestmoreland4100917
Phil Wilson | For the Tribune-Review
Bruce Weber, left, talks with museum Director/CEO Judith O’Toole at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. The museum hosted the opening of “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit”. Weber wrote the catalogue for the show.

An “incredible gift” given to The Westmoreland Museum of American Art is bringing recognition to 19th- and 20th-century American sculpture.

Patrons got a first look at “A Timeless Perfection: American Figurative Sculpture in the Classical Spirit — Gifts from Dr. Michael L. Nieland,” during an Oct. 7 opening at the Greensburg museum.

Chief curator Barbara Jones said the 57-piece collection, which represents the opulence of the Gilded Age, includes the work of a number of female artists, like Malvina Hofmann.

“We’re very fortunate to get it,” Jones said. “It adds breadth and depth, and really does help us tell the story of American sculpture.”

Michael Nieland, at the reception with his wife, Lilli, is a retired dermatologist and dermatopathologist who was a clinical associate professor of pathology at the University of Pittsburgh for 30 years.

“The Westmoreland, with its devotion to American art, is a perfect fit for this collection. Our good fortune to have possessed these beautiful sculptures presents us with the opportunity and the obligation to pass them on,” Nieland said in his donor statement.

A catalogue written by art historian Bruce Weber accompanies the exhibition. Weber was at the reception with his wife, Joanne.

Support for the show, which runs through Dec. 31, was provided by the Richard C. von Hess Foundation and the Hillman Exhibition Fund of The Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

Seen: Richard M. Scaife Director/CEO Judith O’Toole, with Kevin O’Toole, David and Anne Genter, Doug Evans, Patrick Bochy, Paul and Diane Nickoloff, George and Ginnie Leiner, Harley Trice and Lea Simonds, Bruce and Cheryl Wolf, Debra Force, Cameron Shay, Joel Rosenkranz, Lulu Lippencott, Yeeha Chiu and Barbara Ferrier.

— Dawn Law

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.