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Out and About: Whiskey Smash features variety of distillers | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out and About: Whiskey Smash features variety of distillers

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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Eric Miller of Pittsburgh (from left), Lisa Marie Basile of West Newton, Roy Bartlett of Mt. Pleasant and Lisa Allen of Everson, share a toast at the second annual 'Whiskey Smash', held at West Overton Museums on Nov. 19, 2016.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Ryan and Andrea Kenney of Scottdale pose for a photo at the second annual 'Whiskey Smash', held at West Overton Museums on Nov. 19, 2016.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Tom and Marie Tamasy, of South Huntingdon Township, sample whiskey at the second annual 'Whiskey Smash', held at West Overton Museums on Saturday evening, November 19, 2016.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Kevin Jones, (center), joins Annie Quinn, (L), and her husband Ryan Quinn, for a photo at the second annual 'Whiskey Smash', held at West Overton Museums on Saturday evening, November 19, 2016.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), West Overton Museums managing director, Jessica Kadie-Barclay, joins board vice president, Rick Rega for a photo, at the second annual 'Whiskey Smash', held at West Overton Museums on Saturday evening, November 19, 2016.

West Overton’s second annual Whiskey Smash on Nov. 19 was all about the whiskey — down to the salted caramel whiskey gingerbread and the black raspberry whiskey chocolate cupcakes.

“You can make a lot of stuff with whiskey,” said Misty Kunkle, baker and manager of the Cupcake Shoppe in Greensburg, an event participant.

The featured drink was the Whiskey Smash, made with Old Overholt Rye, simple syrup, lemon wedges and mint.

Docent Aaron Hollis shared drone pictures of the crumbling Broad Ford Distillery that still stands along the Youghiogheny near Connellsville. A. & H.S. Overholt Co. made Old Overholt Rye Whiskey at Broad Ford until 1951, but stopped making whiskey at West Overton in 1919. Hollis is earning his master’s degree in public history at West Virginia University and he’s documenting pre-Prohibition distilleries in southwestern Pennsylvania to create an interactive exhibit about the sites for the museum.

Trident Stills in Maine is manufacturing the equipment John Faith needs to start the new distillery at West Overton, but he’s still waiting for a federal permit. Faith, the distillery’s manager, said he has a long list of people waiting for 90 proof.

Seven regional distilleries participated in tastings: Blackbird Distillery in Brookville; Disobedient Spirits LLC, in Homer City; Mingo Creek Craft Distillers in Washington; Ridge Runner Distillery in Chalk Hill; Tall Pines Distillery LLC, in Salisbury; Wigle Whiskey in Pittsburgh; and Red Pump Spirits LLC in Washington.

West Overton’s managing director Jessica Kadie-Barclay said West Overton and the other distilleries work to promote each other.

“This event is about celebrating craft distilling in southwestern Pennsylvania,” she said.

Seen: Rick Rega, Joanna Moyar and Brian McCall, Bill and Gretchen Robinson, Christopher and Amy Faith, Louise Tilzey-Bates,David and Marie Gallatin, Rick and Nancy Thorne, with their daughter, Ellen, Annie Quinn, George and Angie Smouse and Carol Tullio.

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