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24 neighborhood nonprofits share in $341K ‘Small and Mighty’ grants

Natasha Lindstrom
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Submitted
The Black Urban Gardeners and Farmers of Pittsburgh Co-Op will use a $15,000 grant to run a nutrition education program and collect public input about a co-op grocery store and farmers market in Homestead, where the group known as BUGS has built a temporary outdoor greenhouse.
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Submitted
The Black Urban Gardeners and Farmers of Pittsburgh Co-Op will use a $15,000 grant to run a nutrition education program and collect public input about a co-op grocery store and farmers market in Homestead, where the group known as BUGS has built a temporary outdoor greenhouse.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Maxwell King, president and CEO of The Pittsburgh Foundation. (Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media)

The Black Urban Gardeners and Farmers of Pittsburgh Co-Op plans to spend a $15,000 infusion on expanding a neighborhood nutrition program and planning a co-op grocery store and farmers market in Homestead.

Raising Achievement in Monroeville and Pitcairn, a volunteer-led organization known as RAMP, plans to offer $1,000 stipends to 15 teachers who provide one-on-one tutoring to students in the Gateway School District.

Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry plans to spend a $6,760 boost on a new support group for single moms and help with family meals and child care in Bellevue.

The charitable groups are among 24 nonprofits serving Allegheny County that will share in a newly announced round of grants totaling $341,000 through The Pittsburgh Foundation’s “Small and Mighty” program — a funding mechanism available to small to mid-sized nonprofits that demonstrate community-impact bang for their charitable buck.

Small grants, big impact

To qualify, nonprofits must have annual budgets of $650,000 or less and serve residents in economically disadvantaged communities, with an emphasis on youths and young adults, single women raising children and racial and ethnic groups disproportionately affected by poverty. Grants are made in increments of up to $15,000.

“Each Small and Mighty grantee has a track record for being savvy and innovative in developing opportunities for those most in need of access to Pittsburgh’s revitalized economy,” The Pittsburgh Foundation President and CEO Maxwell King said in a statement.

Eighty percent of Small and Mighty grant recipients help with basic needs, such as food, housing, education, child care and health care, foundation officials said. Sixty-three percent are minority-led.

Kitchen of Grace Inc., based in the Marshall-Shadeland section of Pittsburgh’s North Side, won a $15,000 grant to recruit instructors and expand efforts to provide food and hospitality workforce skills to at-risk youths and young adults, ages 16 to 20.

The rapidly growing Western Pennsylvania Diaper Bank, which started as a volunteer-organization in 2012, will use its $15,000 grant toward hiring its first full-time staff, increasing fundraising efforts and developing its board.

The grant program is a piece to the foundation’s broader “100 Percent Pittsburgh” initiative, which seeks to ensure Western Pennsylvanians of all incomes and neighborhoods share in the region’s revitalization. The initiative kicked off in 2016 by focusing on improving the lives, education and housing situations of children and single women raising families.

The Pittsburgh Dream Center plans to spend its $12,500 grant on adding six more monthly sites to its food bank operations. The Foster Love Project will receive $12,000 toward providing clothing and necessities to foster children, and Monumental Baptist Church Mission Ministries, a volunteer-run food pantry in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, is set to get $10,000 toward helping feed more than 700 households.

The foundation’s Small and Mighty grant program has disbursed nearly $900,000 in grants since its inaugural funding round in 2016.

Other $15,000 recipients in this latest funding round include: 1Nation, 5A Elite Youth Empowerment, Brothers and Sisters Emerging (BASE), Coraopolis Youth Creations Inc., Day One Project, Diakonia Ministries, Global Minds Initiative, Helping Ourselves Produce Excellence for Tomorrow Inc. (HOPE for Tomorrow), Hilltop Urban Farm, Message Carriers of Pennsylvania, Off the Floor Pittsburgh, Rainbow Kitchen Community Services, the Will Allen Foundation and Zellous Hope Project. His Place Contact Center will receive $14,850 to provide single mothers in Pittsburgh’s North Side with a resource center and basic needs such as employment, health care and transportation.

The foundation also invited all Small and Mighty grant recipients to participate in its More Than Money initiative, which provides resources such as grant writing, advocacy workshops, peer learning and networking events.

For more information, visit PittsburghFoundation.com/small-and-mighty-grants /.

Natasha Lindstrom is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Natasha at 412-380-8514, [email protected] or via Twitter @NewsNatasha.