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In Monessen, Trump lays out 7-step plan to boost economy

Tom Fontaine
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Don Tirpak, 43, of North Apollo takes a photo during a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum arrives at a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Santorum spoke with media and expressed his endorsement of Trump.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Brett Ryan, 18, of New Castle awaits the arrival of Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Donald Trump's campaign appearance in Monessen in June cast a shadow over this spring's mayoral race.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
President Trump's rally will coincide with the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner, which he elected not to attend in a break from tradition.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Presidential hopeful Donald Trump speaks on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Ray Trice, an employee at AlumniSource, awaits the arrival of Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Trump supporter Bennett Zboyovsky, 16, of Monessen, stands for a portrait after seeing presidential hopeful Donald Trump speak on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. 'Some of the stuff I disagree with and some I really agree with,' said Zboyovsky of Trump's opinions. 'I am more toads closing down borders for a little bit.'
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum arrives at a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Santorum spoke with media and expressed his endorsement of Trump.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Cole Savage, center, 9, of Greensburg, stands with his mother, Robin, after seeing presidential hopeful Donald Trump speak on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Savage described the event as, 'Very inspiring.'
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Trump supporter Ellen Rush, 68, of Kittaning, waits for a chance to see Donald Trump up close after seeing him speak on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Rush says it's the third Trump rally she's been to. A retired teacher's aide, Rush says of Trump, 'I love him, he's great...I think he will bring jobs back.'
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Presidential hopeful Donald Trump speaks on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Trump supporter Janice Caper, far right, 49, of Johnstown, stands next to her daughter, Olivia, 13, as they wait outside AlumiSource in Monessen as they anticipate the arrival of Donald Trump for a rally at the business on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Trump supporter John Fafalios, left, 65, of Belle Vernon, after seeing presidential hopeful Donald Trump speak on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Protestors stand with signs above the road leading to AlumiSource in Monessen as they anticipate the arrival of Donald Trump on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Rhys Castro, front, 19, and Mason Kuh, beside her, 19, work on signs to protest Donald Trump's rally in downtown Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Erika Zommer, back right, 33, of Washington, D.C., said she wast teaching the younger activists to try 'To understand what the other side believes in and reply with compassion.'
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Ernie Sphar, left, and his wife, Mona, of Charleroi, wait with American flags for Donald Trump to drive through downtown Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Ernie is a semi-retired music teacher working on his family farm, he says he will vote for Trump. Mona is undecided. 'I like his views and his support of a lot of the American economy,' said Ernie.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Don Tirpak, 43, of North Apollo, tilts his hat down for a photo as he shows off his collection of signatures from the Donald Trump campaign while waiting in line to see the presidential hopeful in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. 'I got tired of people burring and stepping on the American flag,' said Tirpak, who volunteers for the campaign.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Downtown Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
People wait outside AlumiSource in Monessen as they anticipate the arrival of Donald Trump for a rally at the business on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Christian Sesek, 20, of Brownsville, holds a sign protesting Trump's arrival in Monessen for a rally at AlumiSource on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Sesek says he worries about Trump's effect on another recession and tax cuts for the rich, coupled with his involvement at Trump University. 'Donald Trump is wrong for the Mon Valley,' said Sesek.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Children at the Monessen Civic Center wait in the doorway to catch a glimpse of Donald Trump's motorcade on his way in to downtown Monessen for a rally on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. The children say they hate Trump because they think he hates black people.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
'Trump 16 Make Monessen Great Again,' reads a sign outside of the Chateau Lounge on the way in to downtown Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Presidential hopeful Donald Trump speaks on the economy and trade during a rally at AlumiSource in Monessen on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
PTRTRUMP05062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Donald Trump's campaign appearance in Monessen in June cast a shadow over this spring's mayoral race.
PTRTRUMP01062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
President Trump's rally will coincide with the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner, which he elected not to attend in a break from tradition.
PTRTRUMP04062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump speaks at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
PTRTRUMP07062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Brett Ryan, 18, of New Castle awaits the arrival of Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at a campaign stop at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
PTRTRUMP09062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum arrives at a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Santorum spoke with media and expressed his endorsement of Trump.
PTRTRUMP11062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Don Tirpak, 43, of North Apollo takes a photo during a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
PTRTRUMP10062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Ray Trice, an employee at AlumniSource, awaits the arrival of Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
PTRTRUMP08062916
Justin Merriman | Tribune Review
Former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum arrives at a campaign event for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump at AlumniSource in Monessen, PA on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Santorum spoke with media and expressed his endorsement of Trump.

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump toned down his blustery, off-the-cuff demeanor to deliver a policy-driven, teleprompter-aided speech Tuesday in Monessen that focused on rebuilding the American economy.

“We can turn it around, and we can turn it around fast,” Trump said during his 35-minute speech at Alumisource, with a backdrop of crushed scrap metal behind him.

Alumisource provides shredded scrap to the aluminum and steel industries.

While critics have panned Trump’s campaign for being light on policy specifics, the billionaire businessman unveiled a seven-step plan Tuesday that he said would kickstart economic growth.

Trump said he would withdraw the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement, which he said would be “the death blow for American manufacturing (because) it would give up all of our economic leverage to an international commission that would put the interests of foreign countries above our own.”

“There is no way to fix the TPP,” Trump said. “We need bilateral trade deals. We do not need to enter into another massive international trade agreement that ties us up and binds us down.”

Trump said he would “appoint the toughest and smartest trade negotiators” and then tell the nation’s North American Free Trade Agreement partners that he wants to renegotiate terms of NAFTA. If they refuse, Trump said he would notify them that the United States intends to withdraw from the pact.

Trump said he would direct the Secretary of Commerce to identify violations of existing trade agreements by other countries and direct agencies to “use every tool under American and international law to end these abuses.”

The Treasury Secretary would be directed to label China a “currency manipulator.” Trump said any country that “devalues their currency in order to take advantage of the United States will be met with sharply,” though he did not elaborate.

Trump said he would instruct the U.S. Trade Representative to bring trade cases against China, both in the United States and at the World Trade Organization. And he said if China did not stop stealing American trade secrets and other illegal trade activities, he would “use every lawful presidential power to remedy trade disputes,” including assessing tariffs.

“A new era of prosperity will finally begin,” Trump said.

Denny Mangold, 76, of Gibsonia sprang out of his seat midway through the speech and led a pro-Trump chant.

“I was enthused,” Mangold said afterward. “The speech showed the mentality of a man who wants to bring America back to its potential.”

Terry Nemitz, of Manor said, “I liked that he offered specifics today. He did a better job of presenting himself.”

About 200 people attended the invitation-only speech.

An Ohio Democratic senator and the head of the United Steelworkers union called Trump hypocritical.

“Trump talks about making America great again, but he doesn’t make things in America,” said U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, who participated in a conference call with United Steelworkers International President Leo Gerard in advance of Trump’s speech.

Brown rattled off a list of Trump’s business products that have been made overseas, from business suits, cuff links and teddy bears in China to furniture in Turkey, picture frames in India and shirts in Bangladesh.

“There is nothing that Donald Trump has outsourced that couldn’t be made in America if he was committed to it. He’s a hypocrite,” Gerard said.

Gerard and Brown said Trump has made a fortune off the foreign trade deals that he is railing against.

Trump conceded as much during his speech.

“Our politicians have aggressively pursued a policy of globalization, moving our jobs, our wealth and our factories to Mexico and overseas. Globalization has made the financial elite who donate to politicians very wealthy.

“I used to be one of them, I hate to say it,” Trump said, deviating from the prepared remarks.

Rich Cholodofsky contributed.

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