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Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor in Strip District reopens | TribLIVE.com
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Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor in Strip District reopens

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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Brandon Jackson, 18, of Stanton Heights, serves up a hot fudge sundae with Penn State Creamery ice cream at Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Juliette Dueffert, 9, of Washington, D.C. walks across the floor of Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013. In June, Fox Chapel couple Jacob and Desiree Hanchar purchased Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor and the Penn Avenue building. The old-fashioned ice cream shop was operated by Ray Klavon from 1998 until January, when he died. From the 1920s to 1970s, Klavon’s grandparents had operated a pharmacy in the spot where the ice cream parlor is now. The new ice cream shop owners plan to keep the old-fashioned fixtures, but they have replaced the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery ice cream.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District has remained unchanged under new owners on Sunday, August 4, 2013. In June, Fox Chapel couple Jacob and Desiree Hanchar purchased Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor and the Penn Avenue building. The old-fashioned ice cream shop was operated by Ray Klavon from 1998 until January, when he died. From the 1920s to 1970s, Klavon’s grandparents had operated a pharmacy in the spot where the ice cream parlor is now. The new ice cream shop owners plan to keep the old-fashioned fixtures, but they have replaced the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery ice cream.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
From left to right, Nancy Sloan and Rob Erdeljac, 64, both of Oakmont, are reflected in a mirror eating their ice cream at the counter next to Hanna Mosca and Drew Cranisky, both 25 and of Lawrenceville, at Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Valentina Hanchar, 3, of Fox Chapel, eats an ice cream cone with sprinkles at Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013. Hanchar's parents, Diree and Jcaob Hanchar, bought the ice cream parlor and the Penn Avenue building it is housed in in June of this year. The Hanchars decided to keep the name and much of the original feel of the ice cream parlor but changed the ice cream source from Hershey's to the Penn State Creamery.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Ice cream sundaes served up at Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013. In June, Fox Chapel couple Jacob and Desiree Hanchar purchased Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor and the Penn Avenue building. The old-fashioned ice cream shop was operated by Ray Klavon from 1998 until January, when he died. From the 1920s to 1970s, Klavon’s grandparents had operated a pharmacy in the spot where the ice cream parlor is now. The new ice cream shop owners plan to keep the old-fashioned fixtures, but they have replaced the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery ice cream.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Desiree and Jacob Hanchar, the new owners of Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor, have brought in two new local lines of treats to the classic shop in the Strip, including this fudge from The Art of Fudge in New Castle and artisanal teapops from Healcrest Urban Farm in Garfield.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Old pharmacy bottles sit in a glass case at Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District, leftover from when the location served as a pharmacy from the 1920s to the 1970s. In June, Fox Chapel couple Jacob and Desiree Hanchar purchased Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor and the Penn Avenue building. The old-fashioned ice cream shop was operated by Ray Klavon from 1998 until January, when he died. From the 1920s to 1970s, Klavon’s grandparents had operated a pharmacy in the spot where the ice cream parlor is now. The new ice cream shop owners plan to keep the old-fashioned fixtures, but they have replaced the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery ice cream.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
New owners Desiree and Jacob Hanchar pose for a portrait inKlavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District with their children Gaius (left), 5, and Valentina (right), 3, on Sunday, August 4, 2013. In June, Fox Chapel couple Jacob and Desiree Hanchar purchased Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor and the Penn Avenue building. The old-fashioned ice cream shop was operated by Ray Klavon from 1998 until January, when he died. From the 1920s to 1970s, Klavon’s grandparents had operated a pharmacy in the spot where the ice cream parlor is now. The new ice cream shop owners plan to keep the old-fashioned fixtures, but they have replaced the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery ice cream.
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Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
A colorful mural adorns the outdoor wall of Klavon's Ice Cream Parlor in the Strip District on Sunday, August 4, 2013.

Jacob and Desiree Hanchar and their children fell in love with a popular, old-fashioned ice cream parlor in the Strip District when they visited in the summer of 2011.

Two years later, the Fox Chapel couple bought Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor.

“It had so much detail. And so much that was still in there was authentic. I was like, ‘I have to have this,’ ” said Desiree Hanchar, 34.

Raymond Klavon founded Klavon’s Ice Cream in 1998 in the same Penn Avenue building where his grandparents, James and Mary, ran a pharmacy from 1920 to 1979. He died of lung cancer in January at 64, said his sister Gloria Wolak.

When Klavon opened the parlor, he kept many of the pharmacy’s fixtures: an old medicine cupboard filled with antiquated remedies, a marble soda fountain, tin ceilings, marble terrazzo floors and three phone booths, said Wolak, 60, of Plum.

Klavon’s seven siblings ran the business until May.

Lacking the time and energy to continue, they decided to sell the three-story building, the ice cream shop and the rights to the Klavon’s Ice Cream Parlor name to the Hanchars.

“We feel good about the new owners because they’re keeping the name. … They’re keeping the store intact,” Wolak said.

The Hanchars paid $330,000 for the building and the business in June and reopened on July 21, said Jacob Hanchar, 33. A grand opening celebration is scheduled for Aug. 25, which is National Banana Split Day.

The Hanchars plan to maintain the 1920s look of the shop, but they have made menu changes.

One of the first was replacing the Hershey’s ice cream with Penn State Creamery flavors, Jacob Hanchar said.

“I’m also a Penn State alum, so I have a fondness for their ice cream,” he said.

Klavon’s settled on pepperoni rolls and sandwiches from Mancini’s Bakery, a McKees Rocks business, and gourmet coffee from Indiana-based Commonplace Coffee Co. The shop now carries fudge from the Art of Fudge, a New Castle company.

“I want to make this shop where we carry the best of what Pittsburgh has to offer,” Hanchar said.

Business has been brisk, especially on weekends, he said.

Observatory Hill couple Bobby Thomas, 61, and Diane Grasso, 60, frequented the shop when Klavon ran it. They devoured ice cream sundaes while sitting at the counter on Thursday evening and gave smiles of approval.

The Hanchars have never run a retail business before.

Desiree Hanchar runs a New Mexico-based real estate company, High Knoll Development, and Jacob Hanchar runs the Clearfield-based River Hill Coal Co. that his family founded.

The parents of three maintained ties to the Klavon family.

The Hanchars hired Klavon’s niece, Jamie Klavon, 17, to train new employees. One of Raymond Klavon’s sisters, Geraldine May, still lives in a third-floor apartment.

Tory N. Parrish is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-5662 or [email protected].

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