Archive

ShareThis Page
New Cumberland lock opens after five-day closure | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

New Cumberland lock opens after five-day closure

ptrlockfailure01121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Matt Steigerwald, 26, of Moon, a worker with the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet, repairs the hydraulic lines at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure03121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Charles Stewart, 24, of New Orleans, a deckhand on the Marathon Petroleum towboat Caton, disembarks after the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet halted traffic at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, which stopped working this week.
ptrlockfailure02121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers temporarily stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, last week because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed. Congress has been hesitant to increase funding to the nation's system of locks and dams.
ptrlockfailure04121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The crew of the Marathon Petroleum towboat Caton disembarks after the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet halted traffic at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio.
ptrlockfailure05121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Willie Maynard, of Toronto, Ohio, and lock master at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam looks out over the dam in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure06121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Willie Maynard, of Toronto, Ohio, lock master at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam, talks about repairs being made to the lock in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure07121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed this week.
ptrlockfailure01121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Matt Steigerwald, 26, of Moon, a worker with the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet, repairs the hydraulic lines at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure03121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Charles Stewart, 24, of New Orleans, a deckhand on the Marathon Petroleum towboat Caton, disembarks after the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet halted traffic at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, which stopped working this week.
ptrlockfailure02121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers temporarily stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, last week because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed. Congress has been hesitant to increase funding to the nation's system of locks and dams.
ptrlockfailure04121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The crew of the Marathon Petroleum towboat Caton disembarks after the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet halted traffic at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio.
ptrlockfailure05121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Willie Maynard, of Toronto, Ohio, and lock master at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam looks out over the dam in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure06121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Willie Maynard, of Toronto, Ohio, lock master at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam, talks about repairs being made to the lock in Stratton, Ohio, on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016.
ptrlockfailure07121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed this week.
ptrlockfailure07121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed this week.
ptrlockfailure02121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers temporarily stopped traffic through the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio, last week because the hydraulic system that operates the lock's gates and valves failed. Congress has been hesitant to increase funding to the nation's system of locks and dams.
ptrlockfailure04121616
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The crew of the Marathon Petroleum towboat Caton disembarks after the Army Corps of Engineers Repair Fleet halted traffic at the New Cumberland Lock and Dam in Stratton, Ohio.

Ohio’s New Cumberland Locks and Dam reopened to commercial traffic Saturday morning after hydraulic problems forced the facility to close early in the week.

As of 1 p.m., five tow boats and their barges had passed through New Cumberland’s reopened main lock, said Army Corps of Engineers spokesman Jeff Hawk.

“They’ve got a system down that only extends the (normal average) lock time by about 15 to 30 minutes,” Hawk said.

Under normal conditions, it takes about an hour for boats to get through the lock. Because of the hydraulic failure that happened Monday, New Cumberland crew members are using a 53-foot work boat to help open and close gates at one end of the lock chamber.

The Army Corps’ Pittsburgh district, which oversees 23 locks and dams on the Ohio, Monongahela and Allegheny rivers, has applied for emergency funding to make long-term repairs.

Monday’s closure stopped commercial river traffic on both sides of the New Cumberland facility, which last year handled more than 3,600 barges towing 30 million tons of goods, including coal, aggregates such as sand and gravel, steel, chemicals and other products. As of Thursday afternoon, eight boats had been parked along the Ohio River waiting for New Cumberland to reopen, while three other boats caught in limbo by the delay turned around and returned to their ports.

New Cumberland, located 54 miles downstream of Pittsburgh, opened to commercial traffic in 1959. It is modern compared to the three Ohio River locks and dams in Pennsylvania, which opened in the 1920s and ‘30s.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.