Archive

ShareThis Page
Protesters descend on home of East Pittsburgh Officer Michael Rosfeld | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Protesters descend on home of East Pittsburgh Officer Michael Rosfeld

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, June 27, 2018 9:33 p.m
ptrrosfeldhouse03062818
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Flowers, cardboard headstones, and a banner are put out front of Michael Rosfeld's home in Penn Hills on June 27, 2018. Rosfeld was charged Wednesday with criminal homicide for the shooting death of Antwon Rose on June 19.
ptrrosfeldhouse01062818
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Protesters walk in the direction of Michael Rosfeld's home in Penn Hills on June 27, 2018. Rosfeld, a East Pittsburgh police officer, was charged Wednesday with criminal homicide for the shooting death of Antwon Rose on June 19.
ptrrosfeldhouse05062818
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Protesters walk in the direction of Michael Rosfeld's home in Penn Hills on June 27, 2018. Rosfeld, a East Pittsburgh police officer, was charged Wednesday with criminal homicide for the shooting death of Antwon Rose on June 19.
ptrrosfeldhouse02062818
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Flowers and cardboard headstones are put on the sidewalk in front of East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld's home in Penn Hills on June 27, 2018. Rosfeld was charged Wednesday with criminal homicide for the shooting death of Antwon Rose on June 19.
ptrrosfeldhouse04062818
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Penn Hills police remove items placed by protesters in front of East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld's home in Penn Hills on June 27, 2018. Rosfeld was charged Wednesday with criminal homicide for the shooting death of Antwon Rose on June 19.

Nearly 30 protesters converged Wednesday evening outside the home of the East Pittsburgh police officer charged with homicide in the shooting death of 17-year-old Antwon Rose.

The group brought flowers and cardboard gravestones, which they placed in front of large bushes shielding Michael Rosfeld’s two-story Penn Hills property. They chanted for about 20 minutes before departing.

Penn Hills police watched over the protest and stepped in momentarily to remove items placed on Rosfeld’s property.

Protesters returned to the house late Wednesday, chanting “No justice, no peace.” They left shortly after 11 p.m.

Authorities earlier Wednesday charged Rosfeld with criminal homicide, accusing him of fatally shooting an unarmed Rose on June 19. Video surveillance showed Rose running from a vehicle Rosfeld stopped on suspicion of being involved in an earlier drive-by shooting in North Braddock. Rosfeld is free on $250,000 unsecured bond, though prosecutors said they plan to contest that ruling.

A few of Rosfeld’s neighbors stood on their porches Wednesday night, watching the protest.

“You can’t disagree with them,” said neighbor John Cutruzzula, adding he typically saw Rosfeld only when the officer jogged.

Cutruzzula said he doesn’t mind the increased activity on his street.

“They’re peaceful, not destroying property,” he said. “They’re not hurting nothing — they’re saying their piece; that’s the name of the game.”

Nate Smallwood is a Tribune-Review photographer. Reach him at nsmallwood@tribweb.com.


RELATED: <a href="https://triblive.com/local/allegheny/antwonroseshooting/" target="_blank" Read all of TribLIVE’s coverage on the Antwon Rose case.


TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.