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Slain rapper Jimmy Wopo remembered during funeral in Pittsburgh | TribLIVE.com
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Slain rapper Jimmy Wopo remembered during funeral in Pittsburgh

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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Mourners gather inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Mourners gather inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Family members are overcome with emotion inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Mourners gather inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Mourners gather inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pastor Brandon Humphrey delivers the eulogy towards the end of the funeral service for Travon Smart, who went by the stage name Jimmy Wopo, inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
The casket of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, is wheeled out of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District on June 29, 2018.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A mourners bows her head in prayer inside of Wesley Center AME Zion Church in the Hill District for the funeral of Travon Smart, who went by the stage name, Jimmy Wopo, on June 29, 2018.

Friends, family and fans gathered at a Hill District church Friday morning to mourn rising local rapper Jimmy Wopo.

The start of the service was briefly delayed to allow distraught members of Wopo’s family, including his mother, to compose themselves.

The black casket with Wopo’s body was open as mourners entered the church and closed at the start of the service. Mourners later lined the street to offer condolences to Wopo’s mother.

Wopo, whose real name was Travon Smart, was gunned down about 4:30 p.m. June 18 while he and another man were in a White Mazda SUV in the city’s Hill District. He was pronounced dead about 90 minutes later at UPMC Presbyterian.

The 21-year-old had been set to sign a deal to go on a 27-stop summer concert tour and join a record label started by Pittsburgh-native hip-hop Wiz Khalifa called Taylor Gang.

He’d called his criminal attorney, Owen Seman, just 15 minutes before the shooting. Seman had represented the young artist in two 2015 drug cases, and he said Wopo called to tell him the good news.

“My job was going to be to get him permission to go on this tour and chase his dream,” Seman said the day after the shooting, noting Wopo would need the court’s permission because he was on probation. “And 15 minutes later, that was it.”

“Runnin to the money,” Wopo wrote on Twitter about two hours before the shooting.

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