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South Fayette Commissioners need more time with study on UPMC hospital

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Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
The UPMC logo on U.S. Steel Tower in Downtown Pittsburgh.
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Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
The UPMC logo on U.S. Steel Tower in Downtown Pittsburgh.
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Submitted
A site plan for UPMC’s proposed $200 million hospital in South Fayette.
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Submitted
A site plan for UPMC’s proposed $200 million hospital in South Fayette.
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Customers walk toward the newly opened First Watch restaurant at The Gateway Shops at Newbury Market in South Fayette on Thursday, July 28, 2016.

At least one more month must pass before UPMC and developers of Newbury Market will find out if a proposed new medical facility will be allowed in South Fayette, township leaders determined Wednesday (July 12).

The South Fayette Commissioners said they need more time to review a an economic impact report on the project before deciding whether it should be granted a conditional use, Solicitor Jonathan Kamin said, adding the board only received the report late last week.

“The board wants to digest this report,” Kamin said.

The conditional use allowance would be for 16.65 acres of the 100-acre Newbury parcel, nestled between Chartiers Creek and Presto-Sygan Road. Newbury also has retail and residential components.

The township commissioners and Newbury’s developers, EQA Landmark Communities, agreed in April to commission a financial impact study on the UPMC proposal.

EQA attorney Tammy Ribar reluctantly agreed to continue the hearing until August.

“We would prefer to have a special meeting before,” she said.

The board heard from Jerry Paytas, vice president of Fourth Economy, a community and economic consulting firm, which conducted the study. His synopsis said the study only reported the financial impact a new UPMC facility would have on South Fayette Township, not surrounding communities.

Paytas said construction may cost $211 million and create 570 full-time jobs directly related to the job. Another 183 temporary construction jobs could be created during the building phase.

During the construction, South Fayette could see roughly $300,000 in taxes and fees. That revenue is slated for 2018 and 2019.

Upon completion, Paytas said the township may get $170,000 in taxes, while the South Fayette School District may get almost $400,000.

EQA presented UPMC and Topgolf in the spring as the two anchor projects they say will spur more tenants to sign up for the long-gestating project on 100 acres just west of Interstate 79.

Eric Eisert is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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