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Suspect in fatal Etna shooting reportedly told police ‘I shot them’ | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Suspect in fatal Etna shooting reportedly told police ‘I shot them’

Megan Guza
PTRETNASHOT2041616
James Knox | Tribune-Review
Acting Allegheny County Police Superintendent James Morton confers with Sharpsburg police after a man and woman were fatally shot at the Castle Apartments on Vilsack Street in Etna on Friday, April 15, 2016.
PTRETNASHOT1041616
James Knox | Tribune-Review
A man and woman were fatally shot at the Castle Apartments on Vilsack Street in Etna on Friday, April 15, 2016.
PTRETNASHOT3041616
James Knox | Tribune-Review
A man and woman were fatally shot at the Castle Apartments on Vilsack Street in Etna on Friday, April 15, 2016.

A detective in court Friday morning described the bloody scene police found in Joshua Huber’s Etna apartment when they responded to 911 calls for a shooting April 15.

There was blood on the living area wall, on the kitchen wall below the light switch, on the wall and ceiling above Derek Schindler’s body, and on the apartment’s far back wall in the form of a cross, County Homicide Detective Patrick Kinavey testified before Magisterial District Judge Thomas Miller Jr.

Huber, 30, is charged with two counts of homicide in the deaths of Schindler, 30, of Shaler, and Melissa Zuk, 22, of McCandless.

Kinavey testified the bloody cross shape was not spatter from a gunshot, and it contained drip-patterns and smearing. Zuk was shot once in the chest. Schindler was shot twice, in the head and trunk.

“I shot them. She kept coming at me,” Huber told police when they arrived at the scene, according to an affidavit of probable cause to support charges against Huber. “I shot them.”

Huber told police his friend, Schindler, came over with his girlfriend Zuk and her friend Cassandra Weaver about 9 p.m., and the four drank alcohol and smoked marijuana. Homicide Detective Michael Feeney testified that Huber gave varying accounts of what led to the shooting.

In one, Huber said Schindler became upset with him about some missing money. In another, Huber said he got upset over $40 that went missing. In each, however, Huber said Zuk escalated the argument to a physical fight, and he shot her, causing Schindler to attack him and Huber to fire in self-defense, according to Feeney.

Feeney said Huber was covered in blood during his interview with police, and he had a bloody nose.

Defense co-counsel Robert Andrews and Michael Waltman requested the homicide charges be dismissed, calling the shootings self-defense. Miller disagreed, holding both charges for court.

According to his service record, Huber was a sergeant in a military police unit. He served in the Army from August 2004 to March 2009 and in the Army Reserve from March 2009 to August 2009. He was honorably discharged in 2011.

Formal arraignment is scheduled for July 6.

Megan Guza is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 412-380-8519 or [email protected].

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