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E-waste pickup available on demand in Plum | TribLIVE.com
Plum/Oakmont

E-waste pickup available on demand in Plum

Michael DiVittorio

Plum residents who wish to get rid of old televisions, computers and hazardous waste can do so for free through scheduled pickups.

The borough has contracted with its garbage collector, Republic Services for the electronic-waste service, which has been in place for several months.

“I’ve heard nothing but positive reports back from people who used it,” borough Manager Michael Thomas said. “It’s probably one of those things that people still aren’t aware of.”

The borough and Republic sent out fliers about the service in October and have been reminding residents about it through posts on the Plum Facebook site.

Electronic waste includes TVs, computers, printers, monitors, VCRs, DVD players and other devices. Hazardous waste are things like paint, pesticides, insecticides, batteries, stains and finishes, antifreeze, oils and other liquids. Republic Services collects electronics on Wednesdays. Residents are limited to two items per pickup, but can schedule multiple pickups. Hazardous waste is collected once a month by appointment. Republic’s Tori Clark said the pickups are limited to residential service.

“You can’t landfill those items,” Thomas said. “Most people don’t have an option for those items to get rid of them. They’re either doing so illegally or they’re dumping it somewhere, which is not good for the environment. Or, they’re simply holding on to it.”

It has become very difficult to get rid of televisions and other electronics in recent years. The state’s Covered Device Recycling Act, which took effect in 2013, bans disposal of such devices in landfills.

Best Buy stopped recycling TVs, small or major appliances in the state last year. Those stores still recycle keyboards and computer accessories.

Goodwill stopped taking televisions and CRT computer monitors in 2013, but accepts other electronics.

Evolution E-Cycling in Pittsburgh’s South Side accepts TVs for recycling, but charges fees depending on the size.

“We’re offering the service because the ways to get rid of TVs are very limited,” Clark said.

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer.


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