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Greensburg man got mail — 5 pounds of suspected pot, police say | TribLIVE.com
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Greensburg man got mail — 5 pounds of suspected pot, police say

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:42 a.m
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Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge addresses the audience on the topic of cybersecurity during a daylong conference at Carnegie Mellon University on Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, to discuss better coordinating the city’s role in fighting computer crimes on a national and international scale.
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Tom Ridge
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Governor Tom Wolf, talks to local elected officials, medical personnel, law enforcement and community members, during a roundtable on the opioid abuse epidemic in Pennsylvania, at Highlands Hospital in Connellsville, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2016.
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Marijuana plants

A postal inspector suspicious of a 7-pound package led to the discovery of a marijuana shipment allegedly destined for a Greensburg man’s home, according to court papers.

John Patrick Henigan, 24, was arrested Tuesday on drug and related offenses after police said he opened the package when it was delivered to his St. Clair Avenue home.

Greensburg police were notified Friday of a suspicious package that a postal inspector believed was marijuana, according to a criminal complaint. Investigators obtained a search warrant and said they found 5 pounds of suspected marijuana inside the package addressed to “J. Henigen.” Police placed a device inside that would notify them when the package was opened and resealed it, according to the complaint.

On Monday, the package was delivered to Henigan. Police were alerted that it had been opened, and they confiscated the package from a hiding spot in a clothes dryer along with brass knuckles and a marijuana grinder from Henigan’s bedroom, according to the complaint.

Henigan told investigators that he was not a drug dealer and that he leaves his home when he is notified that a package is set to arrive and returns to find an envelope with cash waiting for him, according to the complaint.

He could not be reached for comment and did not have an attorney listed in online court records.

Henigan was arraigned Tuesday on charges of possession with intent to deliver, criminal use of a communication facility, prohibited offensive weapons, marijuana and drug possession and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is free on $15,000 unsecured bond. A preliminary hearing is set for Sept. 21.

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-837-5374, rsignorini@tribweb.com or via Twitter @byrenatta.

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