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Pothole problem getting rosier on Hempfield’s Roseytown Road | TribLIVE.com
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Pothole problem getting rosier on Hempfield’s Roseytown Road

Jeff Himler
gtrRoseyPotholes2062818
Jeff Himler | Tribune-Review
Motorists drive over recently patched potholes on the evening of Tuesday, June 26, 2018, in the Roseytown Road railroad underpass in Hempfield. PennDOT is planning drainage improvements and a long-term fix for the holes in 2019.
gtrRoseyPotholes1062818
Jeff Himler | Tribune-Review
A motorist drives over recently patched potholes on the evening of Tuesday, June 26, 2018, in the Roseytown Road railroad underpass in Hempfield. PennDOT is planning drainage improvements and a long-term fix for the holes in 2019.
gtrRoseyPotholes3062818
Jeff Himler | Tribune-Review
Large potholes are seen on the morning of Tuesday, June 26, 2018, in the Roseytown Road railroad underpass in Hempfield. PennDOT patched the holes later that day and is planning drainage improvements and a long-term fix in 2019.
gtrRoseyPotholes4062818
Jeff Himler | Tribune-Review
Recently patched potholes are seen on the evening of Tuesday, June 26, 2018, in the Roseytown Road railroad underpass in Hempfield. PennDOT is planning drainage improvements and a long-term fix for the holes in 2019.

Motorists often jostled while driving through the railroad underpass on Hempfield’s Roseytown Road should be relieved that PennDOT crews this week patched persistent potholes there.

A completely smooth ride, however, won’t come until next year, when a permanent fix is planned.

Crews have filled potholes when able, said Valerie Petersen, a spokeswoman for PennDOT District 12. But recent rain and inadequate drainage in the underpass below a Norfolk Southern rail line were frustrating their efforts, she said.

“Our maintenance forces are working pretty much consistently with the water that seeps from the (underpass) stones down onto the roadway,” Petersen said. “They are patching the holes. The problem is the water is always in the holes.”

PennDOT will seek bids next year for an underpass project that will include drainage improvements, Petersen said.

Money for the project hasn’t been finalized. Norfolk Southern is not involved but will be kept apprised as it progresses, she said.

Prior to this week’s patching detail, motorists spent weeks carefully navigating through the underpass, which is on a key connecting road between Route 119 and Donohoe Road. Some avoided it altogether by finding an alternate route.

Customers arriving at the Stone and Company location adjacent to the underpass complained about the large potholes, according to salesman Brian Crosby.

“With the extra cold spell we had, it seemed to create bigger holes this year,” he said.

Crosby noted occasional traffic backups as drivers entering the tunnel waited for the opposing lane to clear so they could veer around the holes — which were worse in the lane headed toward Route 119.

Melanie McCoy, owner of Great Lengths Hair Design on Roseytown Road, said she’d narrowly missed becoming involved in rear-end collisions while amid traffic braking for potholes in the underpass.

She noted some of her clients decided to take a longer route, detouring through Greensburg and along North Tremont Avenue, to avoid the underpass.

“I’ve worked here 12 years, and this is probably the worst it’s ever been,” she said of the potholes.

Jeff Himler is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-6622, [email protected] or via Twitter @jhimler_news.

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