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Tenaska’s gas power plant tries to hire local | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

Tenaska’s gas power plant tries to hire local

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 4:21 p.m
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
gtrTenaska04022317
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station. The natural gas-fired power plant is expected to open by December and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.

Hiring for the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station is complete, with 75 percent of employees coming from Westmoreland County or adjacent counties, the company said Wednesday.

“One of our goals in staffing this plant was to hire qualified employees from the local community as much as possible,” Senior Vice President Todd Jonas said. “I’m proud to say we achieved that goal and, in the process, assembled an experienced team of employees that will be able to continue Tenaska’s record of safe and reliable plant operations.”

Last fall, Tenaska announced the hiring of plant manager Robert Mayfield, who had been the longtime plant manager of another Tenaska facility. The announcement was followed by a phased hiring process that first included management positions at the plant in December, then hourly employees in the first few months of 2018.

Total staffing for the plant is 24 employees — two from Smithton, 11 from Westmoreland County, seven from Allegheny and Fayette counties, and four from other Tenaska plants.

“Our team is eager to get to work,” Mayfield said. “Over the next several months, we will be going through specialized training and preparing for the plant to start operating at full capacity later this year.”

Construction of the natural gas-fueled power plant began in 2016, with direct construction costs of $500 million. Located in South Huntingdon near Smithton, the facility is expected to begin operations in December.

It will be able to provide enough power for about 925,000 homes in the PJM Interconnection market, which coordinates the delivery of power in all or parts of 13 eastern states, including Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia, the company said.

In addition to 650 jobs during peak construction, the project has contracted with more than 100 regional businesses.

Tenaska Westmoreland is owned by Tenaska Pennsylvania Partners LLC, which comprises affiliates of Tenaska, Diamond Generating Corp. and J-POWER USA Investment Co. Ltd.

Additional information about the Tenaska Westmoreland project is available at www.TenaskaWestmoreland.com .

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1280, shuba@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shuba_trib.

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