Archive

ShareThis Page
Monroeville time capsule unearths quirks from 25 years ago | TribLIVE.com
Monroeville

Monroeville time capsule unearths quirks from 25 years ago

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, November 5, 2014 9:00 p.m
TEtimecapsule2110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
John Hyzy opens the vacumn seal while Sally Michalski and Diane Lindsey, Friends of the Library, remove the first item found in the time capsule.
TEtimecapsule7110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
A time capsule buried 25 years ago was opened on Monday, Nov. 3, as Monroeveille Library celebrates its 50th anniversary.
TEtimecapsule8110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
Can anybody remember when you could buy a McDonald's Quarter Pounder and small drink for $1? As part of the Monroeville Library's celebration of its 50th anniversary, a time capsule buried 25 years ago was opened on Monday, Nov. 3. Notice how difference the packaging was from today's wrappers.
TEtimecapsule9110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
News publications detailing the San Francisco earthquake in October 1989 were part of a time capsule buried 25 years ago by Monroeville Library.
TEtimecapsule10110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
The Oct. 25, 1989, edition of the Monroeville Times Express with a front page story about the time capsule. As part of the Monroeville Library's celebration of its 50th anniversary, a time capsule buried 25 years ago was opened on Monday, Nov. 3.
TEtimecapsule6110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
An original Batman t-shirt
TEtimecapsule11110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
As part of the Monroeville Library's 50th anniversary, a time capsule buried 25 years ago was opened on Monday, Nov. 3. The contents, more than 50 items representing life in Monroeville, are on display at the library.
TEtimecapsule5110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
As part of the Monroeville Library's celebration of its 50th anniversary, a time capsule buried 25 years ago was opened on Monday, Nov. 3. The capsule was buried in October 1989 when the Library celebrated its 25th anniversary.
TEtimecapsule1110614
Lillian DeDomenic | For Trib Total Media
John Hyzy opens the vacuum seal and Diane Lindsey, president of the Friends of the Library, removes the first item found in the time capsule. As part of the Monroeville Library's celebration of its 50th anniversary, the time capsule, buried 25 years ago, was opened on Monday, Nov. 3. The capsule was buried in October 1989 when the Library celebrated its 25th anniversary. Over 50 items representing life in Monroeville are on display in the Gallary Space.

Although most of the people in the room were librarians, there was one document none of them could read: an astrological chart, with notation detailing the movement of planets.

“We’re going to need an astrologer,” said Sally Michalski, interim director of the Monroeville Public Library, joking that the library would have to advertise for a new employee.

The horoscope was one of the surprises in store for the small but devoted crowd of library employees and supporters who turned out Monday, the day of the library’s 50th anniversary, to celebrate the opening of a time capsule buried in front of the building in 1989.

The objects sealed inside the aluminum capsule ran the gamut from mass-market fiction by authors such as Danielle Steele and Tom Clancy to Monroeville’s budget from that year and packaging for a quarter-pounder and fountain drink from McDonald’s — bagged with a $1 bill to show the price of the meal at the time.

The capsule also contained a selection of periodicals from the year, along with some other touches that were unmistakably from the 1980s.

One of the books preserved for posterity was “Crystal Awareness,” a volume on New Age spirituality.

Johnna Cornelius, the library’s office manager, said she was surprised to find a hair crimper.

“Who would have thought you’d put that in a time capsule?” she said.

Gideon Bradshaw is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-871-2369 or gbradshaw@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.