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3 sets of siblings help Greensburg Central Catholic volleyball achieve championship success | TribLIVE.com
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3 sets of siblings help Greensburg Central Catholic volleyball achieve championship success

Tribune-Review
| Thursday, November 27, 2014 6:47 p.m
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Ken Reabe Jr. | For Trib Total Media
Greensburg Central Catholic middle hitter Leah Bisignani (21) sets up a play at the net during the PIAA class A girls volleyball state championship match versus Marian Catholic on Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at Richland HS in Johnstown, Pa.
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Ken Reabe Jr. | For Trib Total Media
Greensburg Central Catholic's Mikayla Bisignani hugs a teammate in celebration of her team winning the PIAA class A girls volleyball state championship over Marian Catholic on Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at Richland HS in Johnstown, Pa.
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Ken Reabe Jr. | For Trib Total Media
Greensburg Central Catholic's Haley Moore sets up a play during the PIAA class A girls volleyball state championship match held Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at Richland HS in Johnstown, Pa.
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Ken Reabe Jr. | For Trib Total Media
Greensburg Central Catholic's Rachel Moore (left) sets up a play in front of teammate Megan Stunja at the PIAA class A girls volleyball state championship match held Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at Richland HS in Johnstown, Pa.
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Ken Reabe Jr. | For Trib Total Media
Greensburg Central Catholic's Megan Stunja (left) and Leah Bisignani celebrate their team winning the PIAA class A girls volleyball state championship over Marian Catholic on Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at Richland HS in Johnstown, Pa.

It was a dream season for Rachel Moore, Leah Bisignani, Megan Stunja and the Greensburg Central Catholic girls volleyball team. The trio of seniors helped lead the Centurions to a 23-1 record, a WPIAL title and the program’s first PIAA championship.

What made the historic season even sweeter for these three GCC athletes is that they got to share the team’s special run with their sisters, who also played key roles in the championship run.

“It was such an amazing experience, some siblings don’t even get the chance to play with each other,” Moore said. “It was such a great season but it even makes it 10 times better knowing that I won with my sister, too.”

Moore, the team’s starting libero, is described by GCC coach Heather Meyer as the leader of the team’s defense, while her younger sister, Haley, played setter and led the Centurions in assists as a sophomore. The two have been playing volleyball together for as long as they could remember, and were able to finish off their time on varsity together in ideal fashion.

“Since we were little we would play together in our backyard and stuff,” the younger Moore said. “This was the best way of ending our time playing together. Everything came together for us.”

Since before they can remember, both Moores had always shared the volleyball court with the Bisignani sisters, as well. Leah, GCC’s team leader in kills, had always been teammates with Rachel Moore while her younger sister, Mikayla, grew up playing with Haley Moore.

For sophomore right-side hitter Mikayla Bisignani, the experience of sharing a team with her senior sister helped her feel at ease on the court from the very beginning.

“It was definitely comforting. Coming into high school as a freshman and playing a fall sport, it helped so much already knowing Leah, Rachel, Haley, Megan and them,” Mikayla said. “It made me comfortable at practice and helped me get better.”

At the same time, having a younger sister on the team made Leah Bisignani realize quickly how important she could be as a leader.

“I know some people may have looked up to me, but with Mikayla it was that times two,” the elder Bisignani said. “It made me really want to work harder and provide a good example.”

While the Moores and Bisgnanis shared a bond as players, Maryann and Megan Stunja enjoyed the team’s championship run through their player-coach relationship.

Former GCC volleyball player Maryann Stunja was hired as an assistant by Meyer three seasons ago. She said the payoff of seeing her sister achieve such great success was worth all of the efforts they both put in.

“To be able to watch a match and say ‘That’s my sister,’ it was an honor to me, even though I wasn’t on the court with her,” Coach Stunja said. “It was amazing just to be able to help out on the way.”

Megan Stunja said playing for her sister was an invaluable experience.

“She’s the one that introduced me to the sport when I was 9,” the younger Stunja said. “She’s always been around, and she has helped me tremendously.”

Although the older Moore and Bisignani sisters will be graduating at the end of the year, the Centurions still have another sister act on the horizon. The Stawovy sisters, Brittany and Olivia, a sophomore and freshman, respectively, played JV together and figure to play a role in the future for GCC volleyball. Meyer can only hope that someday this pair will impact her team in the same way the Moore, Bisignani and Stunja siblings have.

“I think their relationships just set the tone with everybody. It helped with everybody getting along, and the blending of the younger girls and the older girls,” Meyer said. “I really think that contributed to the success of our team because everybody just got along and accepted each other no matter what grade they were in.”

Kevin Lohman is a freelance writer.

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