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Brewing company creates beer in honor of baby hippo Fiona | TribLIVE.com
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Brewing company creates beer in honor of baby hippo Fiona

The Associated Press
| Friday, May 26, 2017 12:06 p.m
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Fiona, a prematurely born hippopotamus, swims April 12, 2017, in her quarantine enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens in Cincinnati.
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In this March 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, Fiona a prematurely born hippopotamus, rests in her quarantine enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens in Cincinnati. (Courtesy Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via AP)
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017 file photo, Bibi, a pregnant Nile hippo at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, roams her Hippo Cove exhibit enclosure in Cincinnati. Bibi delivered her offspring, named Fiona, six-weeks prematurely on Jan. 24. The baby hippo was quickly placed under intensive care by zookeepers who scrambled to keep her alive. Since then, millions have seen her on video, thousands have bought 'Team Fiona' T-shirts and thousands more have chomped on Fiona-themed cookies. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, file photo, Bibi, a pregnant Nile hippo at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, reaches for lettuce leaves in her Hippo Cove exhibit enclosure in Cincinnati. Bibi delivered her offspring, named Fiona, six-weeks prematurely on Jan. 24. The baby hippo was quickly placed under intensive care by zookeepers who scrambled to keep her alive. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
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In this Wednesday, April 12, 2017, photo, visitors read a sign depicting Fiona, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens' new baby hippopotamus, as they pass through the Hippo Cove exhibit, in Cincinnati. Millions have seen her on video, thousands have bought 'Team Fiona' T-shirts and thousands more have chomped on Fiona-themed cookies. The public embrace of the Cincinnati Zoo's prematurely born hippopotamus has helped ease the months of backlash over the death of the zoo's gorilla Harambe. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
HippoHappiness89747jpg984dd
FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017 file photo, Bibi, a pregnant Nile hippo at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, roams her Hippo Cove exhibit enclosure in Cincinnati. Bibi delivered her offspring, named Fiona, six-weeks prematurely on Jan. 24. The baby hippo was quickly placed under intensive care by zookeepers who scrambled to keep her alive. Since then, millions have seen her on video, thousands have bought 'Team Fiona' T-shirts and thousands more have chomped on Fiona-themed cookies. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
HippoHappiness98984jpg34c6c
In this Wednesday, April 12, 2017, photo, visitors read a sign depicting Fiona, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens' new baby hippopotamus, as they pass through the Hippo Cove exhibit, in Cincinnati. Millions have seen her on video, thousands have bought 'Team Fiona' T-shirts and thousands more have chomped on Fiona-themed cookies. The public embrace of the Cincinnati Zoo's prematurely born hippopotamus has helped ease the months of backlash over the death of the zoo's gorilla Harambe. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
HippoHappiness91984jpg48134
FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, file photo, Bibi, a pregnant Nile hippo at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, reaches for lettuce leaves in her Hippo Cove exhibit enclosure in Cincinnati. Bibi delivered her offspring, named Fiona, six-weeks prematurely on Jan. 24. The baby hippo was quickly placed under intensive care by zookeepers who scrambled to keep her alive. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
HippoHappiness50349jpgd7a94
In this March 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens, Fiona a prematurely born hippopotamus, rests in her quarantine enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens in Cincinnati. (Courtesy Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via AP)
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This May 15, 2017, photo provided by the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden shows a can for Listermann Brewing Company's Team Fiona beer, featuring an image of the Nile hippopotamus named Fiona born prematurely Jan. 24 at the zoo in Cincinnati. (Chad Yelton/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden via AP)

CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Zoo’s prematurely born hippo named Fiona is getting a new beer in her honor.

Listermann Brewing Company is releasing a Team Fiona New England-style IPA. The hippo’s care team helped brew the beer.

And the brewing company says 25 percent of the beer sales proceeds is being donated to the zoo’s care team.

The brewing company describes the beer as having a soft mouth feel, hazy appearance with a fruit-juice flavor.

Fiona was born at the zoo in January, weighing just 29 pounds (13 kilograms). She now weighs more than 100 pounds (45 kilograms). Zoo caretakers are preparing to move her to a group of hippos that includes her parents.

Listermann’s general manager says watching Fiona grow up has been a joy.

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