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Carnegie Elementary School students get invested in career lunch

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Randy Jarosz | For Trib Total Media
Northwest Savings Bank, office manager Jack Dillie takes questions from 6th graders during a career day Wednesday, November 5 at Carnegie Elementary School.
SIGcareerday2111314
Randy Jarosz | For Trib Total Media
Northwest Savings Bank, office manager Jack Dillie talks about his job at the bank to 6th graders during a career day Wednesday, November 5 at Carnegie Elementary School.
SIGcareerday3111314
Randy Jarosz | For Trib Total Media
Northwest Savings Bank, office manager Jack Dillie talks about his job at the bank to 6th graders during a career day Wednesday, November 5 at Carnegie Elementary School.

It might be several years until they can manage their own bank accounts, but sixth graders at Carnegie Elementary School learned about the banking world during lunch last week.

Jack Dillie, branch manager of Northwest Savings Bank in Carnegie, answered questions and described a typical day at the bank for students as part of the school’s monthly career lunch event.

“It went better than expected. I didn’t even get through my entire presentation because they were so interested in each part and had questions,” he said.

The lunch program is in its fifth year, organized by Mayor Jack Kobistek and is sponsored by Northwest Savings Bank, which supplies the lunches each month.

Other professionals this year have included attorneys and law enforcement officials.

It is no coincidence the lunches are held for the oldest grade at the school.

“They are preteens and it is right before they go to high school. Hopefully we are giving them something to think about before going to high school,” Kobistek said. “You can center someone’s education around that career or explore the career in more detail. It gives them something to think about.”

Cynthia Bevan, a sixth grade teacher, said she has enjoyed seeing the interaction between the community professionals and students.

“They get a different experience every month. These kids don’t fully understand what types of jobs are out there whether or not they plan on going to college. (These are) educational one-on-one presentations that leaves them relaxed while learning.”

Magan Henke, 11, who experienced her first career lunch said Dillie’s presentation left her already thinking about her future.

“I think I want to be a banker when I grow up because this influenced me more. I’d probably be a teller because I am a people person,” she said.

At the end of the day, Kobistek said the program provides a way for students to see what’s available for them locally.

“I want to make sure the partnership of our community and schools are strong. It’s important to connect and allow these kids to see at an early age the type of opportunities available in Carnegie for them,” Kobistek said.

Alex Felser is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-388-5810 [email protected].

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