Archive

ShareThis Page
Carnegie Museum of Art, VIA celebrate Hillman Photography Initiative with party featuring national acts | TribLIVE.com
News

Carnegie Museum of Art, VIA celebrate Hillman Photography Initiative with party featuring national acts

ptrffnow01051115
John Altdorfer
DJ Juliana Huxtable entertained during the NowSeeThis Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow02051115
John Altdorfer
Divya Heffley shared the big screen with projected images during the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow03051115
John Altdorfer
Valerie Hess and Nathan Darity were among the guests attending the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow04051115
John Altdorfer
Muz Saleem sported canary yellow shorts during the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow05051115
John Altdorfer
Sean Matasin, Amy Svobdoa and Qianran Cui were among the guests attending the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow06051115
John Altdorfer
Rebekah Fry and Samuel Cooper were among the kids in the hall during the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow09051115
John Altdorfer
VIA co-founders Lauren Goshinski and Quinn Leonowicz enjoyed the awesomeness of the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow07051115
John Altdorfer
Maureen Kelly and Randall McKennie were among the guests attending the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow08051115
John Altdorfer
Meghan Hipple and Karen Lue were among the guests attending the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015
ptrffnow10051115
John Altdorfer
Fans of DJ Juliana Huxtable hit the dance floor during the Now See This Party held by the Carnegie Museum of Art and VIA-PGH at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland. May 9, 2015

For the few unsuspecting souls who hadn’t gotten the memo that the Carnegie Museum of Art was taking a swan dive into unconventionality, the May 9 #NowSeeThis collab with VIA didn’t take long to make an indelible first impression.

“When we first turned the bass on, can lights in the ceiling got unhooked and were hanging from the ceiling,” said VIA co-founder Quinn Leonowicz. “We broke the museum!”

And that was an hour into the party.

With an end point set at “11ish or whenever,” hundreds of millennials descended with abandon for this nod to visual culture where physical and virtual melted under the intersecting heat of music, photography and technology.

“The language images speak is so powerful. It’s visceral, it’s primal. It’s totally intuitive,” said Divya Heffley, program manager for the Hillman Photography Initiative at the museum.

It was also about letting hair down. Not to mention, kicking tradition to the curb.

“We want to change the perception of the Carnegie Museum of Art. It’s not just about standing around and looking at art. We want to break those barriers,” said Brad Stephenson, the museum’s director of marketing.

The live performances responsible for the aforementioned ceiling-shaking included an electric-blue lipped Juliana Huxtable, the New York City DJ recently crowned “Star of the 2015 New Museum Triennial” by Vogue magazine, and singers Kelela and Dinner, not to be confused with the third meal of the day.

“We wanted to be sure whatever we did was big and noticed,” said Jonathan Gaugler, the museum’s media relations manager.

Spied were VIA co-founder Lauren Goshinski, Greg Langel, Mary Grace Brown, Lauren Gillespie, Samuel Cooper and Rebekah Fry, Valerie Hess and Nathan Darity,Muz Saleem, Sean Matasin, Amy Svobdoa, Qianran Cui,Maureen Kelly andRandall McKennie, Meghan Hipple and Karen Lue.

Kate Benz is the social columnist for Trib Total Media and can be reached at kbenz@tribweb.com, 412-380-8515 or via Twitter @KateBenzTRIB.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.