Archive

Antwon Rose: From the protests to the funeral | TribLIVE.com
Local News

Antwon Rose: From the protests to the funeral

gtrantwongallery20jpg
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
The mother of Antwon Rose, Michelle Kenney, breaks down in tears during the funeral service for Antwon Rose at Woodland Hills Jr. High School on June 25, 2018.
gtrantwongallery01jpg
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Jona Reyes, 26, of East Pittsburgh, is overcome with emotion while demonstrating with protesters following the shooting of Antwon Rose by East Pittsburgh police.
gtrantwongallery16jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Photos of Antwon Rose Jr. were carried by marchers on Fifth Avenue during Pittsburgh's Juneteenth Parade from Freedom Corner in the Hill District to Point State Park, Saturday, 23, 2018. The parade served as an outlet for the crowd to protest East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld's fatal shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose, a Woodland Hills High School honors student.
gtrantwongallery11jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Activist, Ciora Thomas confronts a State Troopers in riot gear after more than 150 people took over the Parkway East in both directions, Thursday, June 22, 2018 to protest East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld East fatal shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose, a Woodland Hills High School honors student. Thomas was the only marcher arrested.
gtrantwongallery03jpg
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Children play in the rain as other community members took to the streets to protest around police headquarters in East Pittsburgh on June 20, 2018.
gtrantwongallery15jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Woodland Hills students, Tia Taylor of Rankin (left) and Jameira Mosley of Rankin weep after Taylor spoke about Antwon Rose in Market Square in Downtown Pittsburgh, Friday, June 22, 2018, after a march to protest East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld's fatal shooting of 17-year-old Rose, a Woodland Hills High School honors student.
gtrantwongallery19jpg
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Funeral home employees lower the lid on the casket holding Antwon Rose prior to his funeral service at Woodland Hills Jr. High School on June 25, 2018.
gtrantwongallery17jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
A group of around 500 protesters confront Pittsburgh Police by kneeling and raising their hands chanting 'Hands Up,' on Pittsburgh's South Side, Saturday, June 23, 2018, to protest East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld's fatal shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose, a Woodland Hills High School honors student.
gtrantwongallery21jpg
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
The mother of Antwon Rose, Michelle Kenney, embraces Leon Ford Jr., who delivered the eulogy at the funeral service for Antwon Rose at Woodland Hills Jr. High School on June 25, 2018.

After days of protests, community members paused Monday for the funeral service of teenager Antwon Rose, who was fatally shot last week by an East Pittsburgh police officer. Tribune-Review photojournalist Nate Smallwood, who has covered the protests alongside colleague Andrew Russell, has been granted access to the funeral services by Rose’s family. Here is a collection of their images.


RELATED: <a href="https://triblive.com/local/allegheny/antwonroseshooting/" target="_blank" Read all of TribLIVE’s coverage on the Antwon Rose case.


TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.