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Dow hits another high on Fed stimulus plan | TribLIVE.com
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Dow hits another high on Fed stimulus plan

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve wanted to push interest rates lower and jump-start financial markets with its $600 billion economic stimulus plan. So far, it’s getting the results it wants.

Long-term interest rates sank and stocks indexes hit highs Thursday, a day after the Fed announced its bond-buying plan. The Dow Jones industrial average soared more than 220 points, reaching another high for the year. All three main stock indexes reached 2010 highs this week.

After five consecutive days of gains, the Dow Jones industrial average returned to levels last seen in early September 2008, before the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the worst days of the financial crisis.

“Much of today’s gains comes as a result of the government pumping money into the market,” said Joe Kinahan, the chief derivatives strategist at TD Ameritrade.

The dollar fell against other currencies as traders anticipated lower U.S. interest rates because of the Fed’s bond-buying program. Crude oil, gold and other commodities rose.

The Dow rose 219 points, or 1.9 percent, to close at 11,434.84. The broader S&P 500 index rose 23.10 points, or 1.9 percent, to 1,221.06, and the technology-heavy Nasdaq composite gained 37 points, or 1.5 percent to 2,577.34.

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve announced it plans to buy $600 billion in bonds in an effort to spur spending and ultimately lower the unemployment rate. The central bank was unusually detailed in its announcement, saying it planned to spend $75 billion a month on bonds until at least the middle of next year. That’s on top of the roughly $35 billion a month it’s already buying.

In corporate news, shares of BHP Billiton, the world’s largest mining company, rose 5.9 percent after the Canadian government rejected BHP’s $38.6 billion bid to buy Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan. After the market closes, Kraft Foods Inc., Starbucks Corp. and CBS Corp. will announce earnings.

The Fed’s plan will increase the supply of dollars held by banks and most likely push the value of the currency down. The dollar is at its lowest level since December 2009 against a broad basket of currencies and was down 0.8 percent against that index yesterday. Energy prices jumped, sending oil up $1.80 to $86.49.

Finance ministers in emerging economies such as China and Brazil have criticized the Fed’s stimulus plan, arguing that low interest rates in the United States could fuel asset bubbles in their countries.

Treasury prices have been climbing since the Fed’s announcement. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, fell to 2.47 percent from 2.58 percent the day before.

Five stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange, where trading volume came to 1.3 billion shares.


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