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Electrocuted cable worker’s family sues | TribLIVE.com
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Electrocuted cable worker’s family sues

The family of a Monessen man electrocuted nearly two years ago while he installed cable in a Fayette County community has filed a lawsuit claiming he worked in an unsafe environment.

Ralph Greely died Jan. 6, 2009, when a cable was placed too close to energized power lines, creating a deadly arc that struck Greely as he worked in a bucket truck near Simpson Road in Redstone Township.

Greely, 51, worked as an installer for U.S. Utility Contractor Co. of Ellicott City, Md., which was hired by Verizon for the Fayette County job.

In the wrongful death lawsuit, Greely’s family contends Verizon and Allegheny Energy were negligent in allowing the work at that job site to proceed without first cutting the power to those lines.

“Both Verizon and Allegheny knew or should have recognized that the work at this location was likely to create a risk of death or serious harm unless the lines were de-energized or special precautions were taken,” according to the lawsuit.

In the lawsuit, the Greely estate claims that Verizon failed to make sure that power was cut to the lines at the work site, did not provide safe locations where cables could be attached and failed to take other safety precautions.

Allegheny Energy did not cut power to the job site or inspect or assess the location for potential dangers, and failed to provide protective measures, according to the lawsuit.

Verizon spokesman Lee Gierczynski declined to comment on the lawsuit. Allegheny Energy representatives could not be reached for comment.

Greely’s estate is seeking an unspecified amount in compensatory and punitive damages.


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