Archive

ShareThis Page
Ferguson officer: ‘I know I did my job right’ | TribLIVE.com
News

Ferguson officer: ‘I know I did my job right’

The Associated Press
459590438
Getty Images
Protesters demonstrate in front of the Ferguson police station on November 25, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo.
20141126T035521Z01EMZ726RTRIDSP3USAMISSOURISHOOTING
REUTERS
People shut down the Manhattan Bridge while they protest against the verdict announced in the shooting death of Michael Brown, in New York, November 25, 2014.
20141126T040709Z01BKS104RTRIDSP3USAMISSOURISHOOTING
REUTERS
Demonstrators gather for a protest in Boston, Mass., November 25, 2014.
FergusonClaytonProtestJPEG0d3a9
Olivia Petitt, of St. Louis, Mo., cries while she prays during a gathering of people and clergy members before protesting in Clayton, Mo., on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, the day after a grand jury decided not to indict a white police officer in the killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown.
Was8883467
AFP/Getty Images
Police block the West Florissant Avenue, where protesters and looters rampaged businesses following the grand jury decision in the fatal shooting of a 18-year-old black teenager Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Mo., on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014.
Was8883453
AFP/Getty Images
A journalist photographs a burnt out store, which was set ablaze following the grand jury decision in the fatal shooting of a 18-year-old black teenager Michael Brown on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo.
20141125T233959Z01TOR343RTRIDSP3USAMISSOURISHOOTING
REUTERS
Officer Darren Wilson is pictured in this undated handout evidence photo from the August 9 Ferguson Police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, released by the St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office on November 24, 2014.
APTOPIXFergusonJPEG0b818
A St. Louis County Police tactical team arrives on W. Florissant Avenue to disperse a crowd as the Beauty Town store burns on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Dellwood, Mo. The building and several others in and around Ferguson were burned during protests after a grand jury decided not to indict a white police officer in the killing of unarmed, black 18-year-old Michael Brown.
FergusonJPEG0984b
Firefighters put out several cars that were set fire at an auto dealership on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, in Dellwood, Mo., over a grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer in the killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown.

FERGUSON, Mo. — Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson says he couldn’t have done anything differently in his confrontation with Michael Brown to have prevented the 18-year-old’s shooting death.

Wilson made his first public statements Tuesday during an interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos. He offered details of the Aug. 9 shooting like those contained in his grand jury testimony, released a day earlier after it was decided he wouldn’t be indicted in the death.

Wilson says he felt like it was his duty to chase Brown after a confrontation at his police vehicle. When asked about witness accounts that Brown at one point turned toward Wilson and put his hands up, he responded “that would be incorrect.”

He told Stephanopoulos he has a clean conscience because “I know I did my job right.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.