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Frick Art & Historical Center’s Holiday Party includes carolers, Clayton tours

Tribune-Review
| Sunday, December 14, 2014 9:00 p.m.
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John Altdorfer
Carolers sernaded guests with songs of the season during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Suzzara Durocher joins her cousin Edward Dane during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Dianne Shaunessy with Frick director Robin Nicholson during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Asher, Hannah and Mira Schwartz watch as docent Cassie Wright demostrates how to use 19th century kitchen tools in the kitchen of Clayton, the home of Henry Clay Frick, during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Theresa Sneider joins Tory Moore in front of the orchestrion in Clayton, the home of Henry Clay Frick, during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Leanne and Bill Stickman stop for a sweet treat at the Cafe at the Frick during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
A small table topped with gifts hints at what presents may have awaited children on Christmas morning at Clayton, the home of Henry Clay Frick, during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.
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John Altdorfer
Brittany Sopko and Andrew Emery view merchandise at the Orientation Center during the annual Holiday Party at the Frick Art Center in Point Breeze. Dec. 11, 2014.

It was hard to tell which indulgence was sealing the deal for 400 guests of the Frick Art & Historical Center’s annual Holiday Party.

And then, the roasted chestnuts appeared.

“They’re always a big favorite,” said marketing manager Greg Langel.

Capturing the spirit of Christmas like only the Frick can, the evening of Dec. 10 began with a glass of champagne and ended with a chorus of regrets about having to leave. A reception in the museum afforded opportunities to peruse the current exhibition, “Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal,” as well as seasonal artwork by Giovanni di Paolo and Hubert Robert before it was time to brave the cold.

Once on the path, carolers from the Boar’s Head Wassail Consort awaited, delighting passersby as they sipped on mulled cider and hot chocolate while a tempting array of sweets from Rania’s Catering trumped any intentions of good behavior.

Then, it was on to Clayton, which had been decked out in the jaw-dropping splendor of its “Home for the Holidays” installation. On the first floor, docents — Jan Treser, Joyce Dorman, Ginger Polozoff, Pam Price, Cassie Wright, Kristine Comito, Melanie Linn-Gutowski, Marianne Lesonick — were captivating imaginations with the revelation of some Frick family lure, highlighting a preservation effort for which 93 percent of the artifacts are original to the home.

“It’s a joy working here,” said docent Jamie Blatter. “People in Pittsburgh are in love with our house.” On the list were Frick director Robin Nicholson with Dianne Shaunessy, cousins Edward Dane and Suzzara Durocher (both descendents of Henry Clay Frick), Nancy Bromall Barry, Joel Bernard, Cary and Richard Reed, Matthew Teplitz and Dr. Sue Challinor, Betsy and Chuck Watkins, Anne andDavid Genter, Dr. BillSwartz, Theresa Sneider andTory Moore, LeanneandBill Stickman.

Kate Benz is the social columnist for Trib Total Media and can be reached at kbenz@tribweb.com, 412-380-8515 or via Twitter @KateBenzTRIB.

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