Archive

ShareThis Page
Cancer Be Glammed offers pick-me-up for women undergoing treatment | TribLIVE.com
Health

Cancer Be Glammed offers pick-me-up for women undergoing treatment

The coral-colored sleeve on her right arm blended into her outfit.

It complemented her dress so nicely that no one noticed it until she said something about it.

“My sleeve is one of the products that we talk a lot about,” says Lisa Lurie, a breast cancer survivor. “This sleeve is for lymphedema — arm swelling. The company that makes these sleeves is LympheDivas. It has turned an ugly compression bandage into a fashionable sleeve. They create them to look like tattoos, decorated with Swarovski crystals or denim and many other stylish options in amazing colors and prints and patterns. They are both fashionable and practical and make you feel good.”

Providing those kinds of products, which offer a pick-me-up for women undergoing cancer treatment or the lingering effects of the disease, is the mission of Cancer Be Glammed, a company Lurie co-founded with her late friend Ellen Weiss Kander, who died of liver cancer in 2012.

As a way to continue the vision she and Weiss Kander shared, Lurie, of Squirrel Hill, co-wrote “Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style” ($18) with Maureen Kelly Busis of Squirrel Hill. Dafna Yachin of Philadelphia is creative director and executive producer of the publication.

The three attended a book launch on National Cancer Survivors Day at Our Clubhouse in the Strip District, a place that provides comfort, care and hope to those touched by cancer.

Guests included friends, family members, cancer survivors and those currently undergoing medical treatment.

“Just because a woman is going through cancer treatment or dealing with the medical issues that follow chemotherapy and radiation and side effects of prescriptions, doesn’t mean she can’t look and feel good,” Lurie says.

About the book

The publication offers tips and advice from what to bring for a hospital stay to the most comfortable outfits to wear when enduring a chemotherapy treatment to the benefit of head scarves and the proper care of skin as the body changes from medications and procedures.

“I had trouble finding great products and style solutions during my cancer journey, and I thought if I had trouble, others would feel this way too,” Lurie says.

Lurie says there were times she could not figure out how to put herself back together again, and Weiss Kander felt the same way.

Through tears when talking about losing her friend, Lurie says she had to continue their mission in honor of Weiss Kander.

Lurie funded the initial publication costs with money she received after her mother died and continues to look for financial support as well as help with promoting the guide and getting copies in the hands of the medical profession.

The models five

At the book launch, five models who are cancer survivors — Nicole Ferguson of Aliquippa, Kimberly Love of Mt. Lebanon, Lori Haberstroh of Mt. Lebanon, Carol Glock of Bethel Park and Karen DiVito of Shadyside — showcased some of the items.

The quintet agrees looking good equates to feeling good and something small such as a scarf or piece of jewelry can brighten the day when you aren’t feeling well.

“Every chance you can get you still want to feel beautiful despite a cancer diagnosis,” Ferguson says. “One of the worst things people can say to you is ‘you look like a cancer patient.’ I want to look good and feel good and healthy.”

“Meeting Lisa and these wonderful women has been so powerful,” says Glock, who founded The Glock Foundation to raise money for breast cancer research. “It’s hard to vent to people who haven’t gone through what we’ve gone through.”

DiVito says the book helps with making women feel good about themselves.

“When you are diagnosed, you still feel good and look good,” DiVito says. “It’s when you start treatment that you feel and look awful.”

Haberstroh says the clothing can be worn after treatments because it doesn’t look like a medical garment.

“When I was battling breast cancer, I found that when I looked better, I felt better,” Lurie says. “I learned that reclaiming my sense of self was easier once I knew what body-changing side effects to expect and where to find helpful products and fashionable solutions.”

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or [email protected] or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.


GTRLIVCANCERGLAM
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
(from left) Nicole Ferguson of Aliquippa, Kimberly Love of Mt. Lebanon, Lori Haberstroh of Mt. Lebanon, Carol Glock of Bethel Park and Karen DeVito of Shadyside are cancer survivors. The women are modeling items from 'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style,' an easy-to-use guide filled with practical tips and style suggestions to keep you looking and feeling your best.
GTRLIVCANCERGLAM1
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
Lisa Lurie (middle) is co-founder of Cancer Be Glammed and co-author of 'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style.' She created the publication which offers tips and advice to women during cancer treatment with co-author Maureen Kelly Busis (left) and Dafna Yachin who is creative director and executive producer of the guide book.
GTRLIVCANCERGLAM4
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style' is a book which offers tips and advice to women during cancer treatment. It was co-written by Lisa Lurie and Maureen Kelly Busis. Dafna Yachin is creative director and executive producer of the guide book.
GTRLIVCANCERGLAMLURIE3
COURTESY LISA LURIE
Lisa Lurie is co-founder of Cancer Be Glammed and co-author of 'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style.' She created the publication which offers tips and advice to women during cancer treatment with co-author Maureen Kelly Busis and Dafna Yachin who is creative director and executive producer of the guide book.
GTRLIVCANCERGLAMLURIE
COURTESY LISA LURIE
Lisa Lurie (middle) is co-founder of Cancer Be Glammed and co-author of 'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style.' She created the publication which offers tips and advice to women during cancer treatment with co-author Maureen Kelly Busis (left) and Dafna Yachin who is creative director and executive producer of the guide book.
GTRLIVCANCERGLAM1
COURTESY LISA LURIE
Head scarves are a helpful item for women who lose their hair during chemotherapy treatments for cancer. Learn more about head scarves in 'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style,' an easy-to-use guide filled with practical tips and style suggestions to keep you looking and feeling your best. For more information: cancerbeglammed.com
GTRLIVCANCERGLAMSLEEVE
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Lisa Lurie is co-founder of Cancer Be Glammed and co-author of the book'Cancer Be Glammed: Recover in Style.' She is showing her sleeve that helps with swelling due to lingering effects of breast cancer treatment. These sleeves can be stylish and help a woman to feel good. They are one of the products you will learn about in book which was created to offer tips and advice to women during cancer treatment. Lurie co-authored the publication with Maureen Kelly Busis and Dafna Yachin is creative director and executive producer of the guide book.
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.