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Female veterans being recruited to donate brains for injury research | TribLIVE.com
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Female veterans being recruited to donate brains for injury research

Renatta Signorini
MedicalMarijuanaPTSD65189jpg7811e
In this June 28, 2017, file photo, a worker looks at a marijuana plant at the Desert Grown Farms cultivation facility in Las Vegas. Twenty-eight states plus the District of Columbia have enabled the use of marijuana to treat PTSD, and the number has doubled just in the last two years amid increasingly visible advocacy from veterans' groups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
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In this Tuesday, April 7, 2015, file photo, Marine veteran Logan Edwards holds a sign to show support for cannabis for post traumatic stress disorder sufferers, outside the State Capitol in Des Moines, Iowa. Twenty-eight states plus the District of Columbia have enabled the use of marijuana to treat PTSD, and the number has doubled just in the last two years amid increasingly visible advocacy from veterans' groups. (Michael Zamora/The Des Moines Register via AP)
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Jennifer Peltz/AP
Medical marijuana packaging on display at a Vireo Health drug dispensary. Mamy states plus the District of Columbia have enabled the use of marijuana.
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In this March 8, 2016, file photo, Air Force veteran Michael Krawitz, executive director for Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, poses for a photo beside a mobile veterans clinic at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs center in Greensboro, N.C. Medical marijuana first became legal in 1996 in California for a broad range of conditions; New Mexico became the first state specifically to include PTSD patients. β€œIt’s quite a sea change,” Krawitz said. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
MedicalMarijuanaPTSD45872jpg00a60
This June 28, 2017 file photo show marijuana plants growing at the Desert Grown Farms cultivation facility in Las Vegas. Twenty-eight states plus the District of Columbia have enabled the use of marijuana to treat PTSD, and the number has doubled just in the last two years amid increasingly visible advocacy from veterans' groups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
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This June 21, 2013, file photo shows the Department of Veterans Affairs building in Washington.
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This June 21, 2013, file photo shows the Department of Veterans Affairs building in Washington.

Female military veterans are being encouraged to donate their brains for research, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced Wednesday in a collaborative effort.

The National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and nonprofit PINK Concussions are partnering to research the effects of traumatic brain injury and PTSD on female brains.

“In the past, the focus of TBI and PTSD brain research has primarily been based on male brains β€” without any active recruitment for women,” Dr. Carolyn Clancy, executive in charge of VA’s Veterans Health Administration, said in a news release. “We have a lot to learn about how the female brain deals with TBI and PTSD, which makes this effort long overdue.”

Female veterans and active-duty military women and civilians are being recruited, Katherine Snedaker, founder and director of PINK Concussions, said in the release.

Those interested in donating can enroll through PINK Concussions .

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-837-5374, [email protected] or via Twitter @byrenatta.

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