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Man pleads guilty in teen porn case | TribLIVE.com
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Man pleads guilty in teen porn case

A Beaver County man pleaded guilty in federal court Friday to engaging in sexually explicit conduct with a 15-year-old girl to create pornographic photographs he later put on the Internet.

William Monac III, 37, of Midland, entered the guilty plea before U.S. District Judge Gary Lancaster, who ordered a pre-sentencing investigation and set sentencing for Dec. 19.

Monac, who owned a Midland pizza shop and a business creating adult pornography using models, had loaned a pizza shop employee money to take a vacation, prosecutors said.

When she didn’t repay the loan, prosecutors said he photographed her nude in July 1999 at his home, and later posted the photos on the Internet.

Duquesne symposium marks JFK assassination

The Cyril H. Wecht Institute of Forensic Science and Law at Duquesne University will hold a symposium in November marking the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The program, titled “Solving the Great American Murder Mystery: A National Symposium on the 40th Anniversary of the JFK Assassination,” will run from Nov. 20-23 at Duquesne University, Uptown.

The event will feature some of the top investigators and researchers involved in the case, including former Parkland Hospital neurosurgeon Dr. Robert Grossman, who viewed the president’s head wounds but was never called to testify before the Warren Commission, which investigated Kennedy’s death.

Also scheduled to speak is U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, a Republican from Philadelphia, who as a junior counsel to the Warren Commission in 1964 originated the “single-bullet theory” about how Kennedy was shot.

Hearing probes dearth of urban supermarkets

An Oct. 3 hearing in the Hill District will focus on the lack of supermarkets in Pennsylvania’s urban areas.

State Rep. Jake Wheatley Jr., D-Hill District, a member of the House Health and Human Services Committee, said the committee will conduct the hearing from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Hill House’s Kaufmann Auditorium, 1835 Centre Ave.

“Bringing more supermarkets back to our urban neighborhoods would improve our quality of life and help to revitalize the cities that are the cores of our regional economies,” Wheatley said.

For more information, residents can contact Wheatley’s office at (412) 471-7760.

UPMC seeks participants for heart disease study

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center is recruiting participants for a study that will examine why minorities and those who are poor have a higher risk of getting heart disease.

The study is being funded by a $4.3 million grant from the state Department of Health, which got the money as part of the national tobacco settlement.

Dr. Steven Reis, of Pitt’s Graduate School of Public Health, said researchers will examine whether community-based programs can help reduce disparities in cardiovascular risk. Among other things, they will determine if counselors can help people change their diet and habits.

The study will recruit 1,000 white and 1,000 minority participants, both male and female. They must be between 45 and 75 years old. For more information, call the UPMC Comprehensive Heart Center at (412) 647-5840.


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