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300 Pa. State Police personnel to aid in Baltimore

The Associated Press
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A man sits on a bicycle in front of a line of police officers in riot gear as part of a community effort to disperse the crowd ahead of a 10 p.m. curfew in the wake of Monday's riots following the funeral for Freddie Gray, Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Baltimore.
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A woman runs for safety as police throw tear gas canisters while enforcing curfew, Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Baltimore, a day after unrest that occurred following Freddie Gray's funeral. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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Maryland National Guardsmen patrol near downtown businesses in Baltimore, Tuesday, April 28, 2015, a day after looting and arson erupted following the funeral of Freddie Gray.

HARRISBURG — The Pennsylvania State Police is sending 300 troopers and other personnel to help authorities in Baltimore as they try to maintain peace and prevent a repeat of looting and arson that erupted earlier this week.

The approximately 6,000-employee agency said Wednesday that Maryland had accepted its offer of resources. The deployment is expected to begin later this week. Maryland will reimburse Pennsylvania’s costs.

Pennsylvania state troopers have helped other states before, including New Jersey with Hurricane Sandy cleanup in 2012.

Acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown says personnel from stations across Pennsylvania will go. Before he was tapped by Gov. Tom Wolf to lead the state police, Brown was the No. 2 commander in Baltimore’s police force and commanded the Maryland State Police until January.

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