Archive

ShareThis Page
Trump nominates AccuWeather CEO to head U.S. weather agency NOAA | TribLIVE.com
Pennsylvania

Trump nominates AccuWeather CEO to head U.S. weather agency NOAA

The Associated Press
| Thursday, October 12, 2017 7:03 a.m

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has nominated the CEO of a private weather company to head the government agency that oversees the National Weather Service, an organization the nominee has at times clashed with.

Barry Myers, who runs State College-based AccuWeather, was chosen as undersecretary of Commerce and head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The weather service is part of NOAA.

Last year, Myers told the House Science Committee he had problems with the way NOAA keeps some data private and how it works with competing weather firms.

The union that represents weather service employees has criticized a possible Myers nomination as a conflict of interest.

Meteorologists at other private firms have said Myers, a Penn State graduate, could take the agency to new heights.

Myers has spent 10 years at the helm of Accuweather. He received bachelor’s degrees in business and economics and a master’s in business from Penn State, where he also spent 18 years on the faculty.


gtraccuweather1090917
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Director of news and content optimization Meghan Mussoline works at the AccuWeather headquarters in State College Friday, Sept. 8, 2017, with meteorologist Brian Thompson.
gtraccuweather2090917
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Techs work in the studio control room Friday, Sept. 8, 2017 at AccuWeather headquarters in State College, as broadcast meteorologists prepare to record weather forecasts for the regions of Florida as Hurricane Irma makes its way northward.
HurricaneIrma54019jpga3080
The Interstate remains empty as the outer bands of Hurricane Irma reached South Florida early Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017 in Miami. Gov. Rick Scott urged anyone living in an evacuation zone in southwest Florida to leave by noon as the threat of Hurricane Irma has shifted west.
APTOPIXHurricaneIrma72285jpg11812
Annette Davis kisses her son Darius, 3, while staying at a shelter in Miami after evacuating from their home in Florida City, Fla., ahead of Hurricane Irma on Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017.
HurricaneIrma62332jpg617e1
A lone pedestrian walks through the usual bustling South Beach ahead of Hurricane Irma in Miami Beach, Fla., Friday, Sept. 8, 2017. Florida has asked 5.6 million people to evacuate ahead of Hurricane Irma, or more than one quarter of the state's population, according to state emergency officials.
HurricaneIrma71416jpgb162d
Tim Grollimund looks at the projected path of Hurricane Irma on his phone while staying in a shelter in Miami after evacuating his home in Key Largo along the Florida Keys, Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017.
gtraccuweather2090917
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Techs work in the studio control room Friday, Sept. 8, 2017 at AccuWeather headquarters in State College, as broadcast meteorologists prepare to record weather forecasts for the regions of Florida as Hurricane Irma makes its way northward.
ptrirmapittsburgh1091017
Kaaren Terpack
People line up for supplies outside of a Miami Costco store.
ptrirmapittsburgh2091017
Kaaren Terpack
Gas lines outside of a Costco in Miami.
ptrirmapittsburgh3091017
Christina Gradnik
Photo from the road Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017, near Tampa, Fla., as Hurricane Irma approaches.
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.