Archive

ShareThis Page
Personality Test: Judith Hansen O’Toole | TribLIVE.com
News

Personality Test: Judith Hansen O’Toole

PTRtkPERSONALITYTEST122415
THE WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART
Judith Hansen O'Toole

As an expert and author in the field of 19th- and 20th-century American art, Judith Hansen O’Toole is a regular speaker at venues like Sotheby’s, the National Gallery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Chicago Art Institute.

But she’s happiest when she’s fulfilling her role as director and CEO of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art since 1993.

O’Toole attended the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and the University of Minnesota and has a master’s degree in art history from Penn State.

In response to her leadership and community orientation, the Westmoreland museum was the subject of a PBS Visionaries TV documentary in 2000.

O’Toole has received many awards, including, in 2013, the Business Women First Award, Pittsburgh Business Times.

The star who would play me in the movie version of my life:

Jamie Lee Curtis. She’s really quirky and fun and up for anything that comes along.

Childhood hero:

My father. Sometimes, I was a bit intimidated by his intellect, but he was warm, loving and playful.

The superpower I wish I had in real life:

Hearing what people are thinking. Because sometimes oral communication just doesn’t come out right on either side of a conversation.

Favorite season:

Spring — when everything comes back to life.

Favorite ethnic food:

Greek. I spent six weeks there with my grandparents after high-school graduation. It was wonderful.

I spend the most time on: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or other:

Facebook. I check in with family and friends. We share articles and other news bits.

Favorite guilty pleasure:

Chocolate milkshakes (with whipped cream on top!)

The song I want played at my funeral:

“Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” I’m a real Oz freak.

Something I would do over if I could:

Work harder at learning foreign languages and playing the piano.

My favorite TV or movie villain?

Cruella De Vil

Favorite lunchtime spot:

The museum’s new cafe cart

My favorite sandwich, plus fixings:

Grilled cheese — any cheese — with apple

Best vacation ever:

Tuscany

Place I’d most like to visit:

Marfa, Texas

I wish I had more time to:

Do anything other than work. Although I love my work.

When I was 10, I wanted to be:

In the Navy, like my father

Show I have or want to binge watch:

“The Golden Girls”

My favorite thing about Pittsburgh:

So much going on in the arts.

My quirkiest inherited trait:

Sneezing multiple times in a row. Like 10 to 12. My father did it, too.

One word my mother would use to describe me:

Such a “nice” girl!

In high school, I was:

A nerd. Editor of the yearbook, etc.

My first job:

Nurse’s aide in a nursing home in Minneapolis

My worst job:

Hotel maid. People are slobs!

I’m deathly afraid of:

Heights

Favorite Pittsburgh-area landmark:

Mt. Washington and the view

My most treasured fashion accessory:

Scarves — I have a lot of them, mostly acquired at museum shops.

The Disney character most like me:

Maleficent

My most memorable fashion mistake:

Wearing what I thought was casual to a donor’s “casual” summer party in 1993. I never did that again. Like Oscar Wilde said, “You can never be overdressed or overeducated.”

What you’ll always find in my glove compartment:

An extra pair of sunglasses

The last book I read:

“The Invention of Wings” by Sue Monk Kidd

My favorite website:

The Westmoreland (Museum of American Art), of course!

If I could live my life as someone else, it would be:

I would like to try being a philanthropist. We have been helped by so many. I know it’s not an easy job, but I’d like to try it from that perspective.

The song that always gets me out on the dance floor:

“Take Me Higher” or “Brown Eyed Girl”

Happiness is:

Recently, it’s been riding shotgun on sculpture trips with my husband, Kevin.

My personal motto:

Stay curious. Be interested in big things and happy in small ways.” (Borrowed from Edith Wharton)

Overused phrase I hate most:

“I’m going to circle back to you on that.”

People would be surprised to know that I:

Often dry-mop the floors following an opening reception. (All the staff pitch in, but that’s my specialty.)

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.