Archive

ShareThis Page
Coats for Kids offers bundles of help for youngsters | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Coats for Kids offers bundles of help for youngsters

Tribune-Review
| Saturday, November 1, 2014 9:00 p.m.
PTRGIVEAWAY3110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Donte Coleman, 5, of North Side, looks wide-eyed at the selection of hats and gloves in front of him as he and his brother pick out some winter gear at the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Coats, gloves, and hats were made available to children and middle school students through the program, reaching nearly 1,700 children from across the city this year.
PTRGIVEAWAY4110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Laila Duncan, 8, of East Hills, picks out a new set of gloves with volunteer Tina Cook (left), 44, of Brookline, at the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Duncan came with her whole family to volunteer fitting area children with coats, gloves, and hats for the winter.
PTRGIVEAWAY2110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Isabella Schreiner, 8, of Hazelwood, tries on a winter coat with the help of firefighter Thomas Petronio (back), 60, of Beechview, as the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program takes place at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Coats, gloves, and hats were made available to children and middle school students through the program, reaching nearly 1,700 children from across the city this year.
PTRGIVEAWAY6110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Declan Bartholomew, 7, of Brighton Heights, stands behind boxes of coats at the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Declan came with his whole family to volunteer fitting area children with coats, gloves, and hats for the winter.
PTRGIVEAWAY1110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Sean Morgan (front), 8, of North Side, and his brother Kyle, 6, carry boxes of coats to their father's truck outside of the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. The coats were to be delivered to Spring Hill Elementary, part of Operation Warm, and the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program, which provides coats, gloves, and hats to local children in need.
PTRGIVEAWAY5110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Laila Duncan, 8, of East Hills, tries on a new set of gloves at the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Part of Operation Warm, firefighters and volunteers spent the afternoon distributing hats, coats, and gloves to area children in need.
PTRGIVEAWAY7110214
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Operation Warm program manager Renee Koerner, 26, of Wilmington, DE, helps Nadia Hinton (right), 7, of Greenfield, get fitted with a winter coat at the third annual Firefighters Coats for Kids Program at the Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1 station in Hazelwood on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. Coats, gloves, and hats were made available to children and middle school students through the program, reaching nearly 1,700 children from across the city this year.

Laila Duncan struggled to slide her hand into the five fingers of her fuzzy new pink gloves.

But when she finally did, she was ready for winter.

“I love it,” Duncan, 8, of East Hills said, sporting a brand new purple winter coat, a pink hat and her fuzzy gloves.

Pittsburgh firefighters and volunteers will hand out about 1,700 coats, hats and gloves to kids at 11 elementary schools during their Coats for Kids program, said Ralph Sicuro, president of Pittsburgh Fire Fighters Local No. 1.

On Saturday, kids stopped by the union office in Hazelwood to pick up winter gear. Firefighters will deliver remaining coats, hats and gloves to the schools of the children who couldn’t make it.

Isabella Schreiner, 8, of Hazelwood slipped off a zip-up pink hooded sweatshirt — the warmest coat she had — to try on a new winter coat.

“This came at a really great time,” said her mother, Dayvanna Schreiner, 39.

Temperatures Saturday and Sunday night were expected to drop into the low 30s, according to the National Weather Service. The mountains surrounding Pittsburgh could see traces of snow this weekend.

Firefighters started their Coats for Kids program three years ago when firefighters noticed too many kids without proper jackets.

“There are a lot of things you can go without, but a jacket isn’t one of them,” Sicuro said.

Pittsburgh’s was the first fire department to partner with Operation Warm, a national organization supplying coats to children all over the United States, said Renee Koerner, the group’s program manager. Operation Warm now works with 250 fire departments in cities big and small.

Sicuro said firefighters will see kids running around all winter wearing jackets they gave them.

“It’s a sense of pride knowing that we were able to help a kid out every day of the winter,” he said.

Aaron Aupperlee is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7986 or aaupperlee@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.