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Farewell party for Pittsburgh’s Greenfield Bridge, then the headaches | TribLIVE.com
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Farewell party for Pittsburgh’s Greenfield Bridge, then the headaches

Melissa Daniels
| Tuesday, October 13, 2015 2:09 p.m
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The Greenfield Bridge was the city’s second largest concrete arch bridge when it was completed in 1923, with a 279-foot arch and 466-foot total length.
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The Greenfield Bridge was built for a little over $234,000 when it started in 1921.
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A view of where the concrete arch bridge connects to land, shot about a decade after the bridge was completed in the early 1920s.
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A view from underneath the Greenfield Bridge, which is technically called the Beechwood Boulevard Bridge.
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The original concrete Greenfield Bridge began construction in 1921.
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The original Greenfield Bridge was a wooden span built in 1909 to link Beechwood Boulevard to Schenley Park.
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A view of the Greenfield Bridge under construction, including the specially crafted urns that once lined the entire span.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
A view underneath the Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
Deterioration underneath the Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
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Justin Merriman | Trib Total Media
Guy Costa, City of Pittsburgh Chief Operations Officer, addresses the media at a press conference near the Greenfield Bridge on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, to address the reconstruction project that included detours and road closures.
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Justin Merriman | Trib Total Media
Mike Gable, director of the Department of Public Works, stands on the Greenfield Bridge on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, after a news conference to address the reconstruction project that included detours and road closures.
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Rendering of proposed new Greenfield Bridge.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
The Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
A view from underneath the 93-year-old Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
Deterioration underneath the Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
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Guy Wathen | Trib Total Media
A view underneath the Greenfield Bridge on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.

Motorists will encounter plenty of delays and detours beginning at 10 p.m. Friday and continuing for the next 18 months as the Greenfield Bridge in Pittsburgh closes.

Guy Costa, the city’s chief operations officer, apologized for the inconveniences. He said they are necessary to accommodate a state-of-the-art steel open-spandrel arch bridge, replacing the crumbling concrete structure that exists today.

“It is a major link for motorists, pedestrians and for bicyclists,” Costa said. “It’s going to be a long project.”

The bridge, which connects Greenfield to Schenley Park, will shut down Friday night. A public party dubbed Bridgefest is planned Saturday night on and off the bridge, before the team of contractors from Mosites Construction Co. takes over. The project cost of $17.5 million is the largest in the city’s modern history, Public Works Director Mike Gable said. Federal money will pay 80 percent, with 15 percent coming from the state and 5 percent from the city.

Detour routes will be posted on greenfieldbridge.otmapgh.org . Costa said he expected detours to be tweaked as drivers navigate around Pittsburgh.

“We’re going to ask people to be patient,” he said.

The city estimated 14,000 vehicles a day travel the bridge.

Construction crews during the next two months will take down as much of the bridge as they can.

They will need two weekend closures of the Parkway East, said Pat Hassett, assistant director of DPW’s Bureau of Transportation and Engineering. Those days have yet to be determined, but detours will be in place.

The Parkway East will close for five days after Christmas so the bridge can be imploded.

Melissa Daniels is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-8511 or mdaniels@tribweb.com.

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