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Squirrel Hill massacre ‘likely the deadliest attack on Jewish community’ in U.S. history | TribLIVE.com
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Squirrel Hill massacre ‘likely the deadliest attack on Jewish community’ in U.S. history

Tribune-Review
| Saturday, October 27, 2018 4:42 p.m.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
People react at the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018.

The mass shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Saturday was “likely the deadliest attack on the Jewish community” in the country’s history, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

“It is simply unconscionable for Jews to be targeted during worship on a Sabbath morning, and unthinkable that it would happen in the United States of America in this day and age,” CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt said in a prepared statement.

The last large attack on the Jewish community came in 2014, according to the ADL, when three died in a shooting spree in Overland Park, Kan.



Here is Greenblatt’s complete statement:

“Our hearts break for the families of those killed and injured at the Tree of Life Synagogue, and for the entire Jewish community of Pittsburgh. This is likely the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the history of the United States. We are actively engaged with law enforcement to support their investigation and call on authorities to investigate this as a hate crime.

“It is simply unconscionable for Jews to be targeted during worship on a Sabbath morning, and unthinkable that it would happen in the United States of America in this day and age. Unfortunately, this violent attack – the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in the United States since 2014 – occurs at time when ADL has reported a historic increase in both anti-Semitic incidents and anti-Semitic online harassment . As we mourn those lost and search for answers, ADL will remain steadfast in its mission to fight anti-Semitism wherever and whenever it may occur.”

New Gallery 2018/10/27 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING People react at the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood

cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 300 height 2979 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0002 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 4:08:12 PM width 4171 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Two women embrace following a shooting at Tree of Life Congregation in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Andrew Russell focallength 300 flash 16 cameramake NIKON CORPORATION height 2074 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0015625 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 6:21:31 PM width 3107 cameramodel NIKON D810 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING First responders walk away from the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood

cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 300 height 2859 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.00025 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 4:03:36 PM width 4002 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich speaks with members of the media at the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. PHoto by Nate Smallwood

cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 70 height 3219 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0002 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 5:16:26 PM width 4506 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Pittsburgh PoliceChief Scott Schubert speaks with members of the media following a mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 120 height 2954 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.01 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 8:13:38 PM width 4136 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Flowers are left near the scene of a mass shooting at Tree of Life Congregation in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood

cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 18 height 3174 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0015625 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 6:47:52 PM width 4443 cameramodel NIKON D4 Squirrel Hill shooting Ryan Rhoades, whose wife works for the Jewish Community Center on Forbes Avenue in Squirrel Hill, tells visitors about the closure of the center on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018 after a mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue earlier in the day. Photo by Shane Dunlap cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 16 height 1731 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.002 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 8:44:52 PM width 2600 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Carnegie Mellon University students, from left, Shahzad Khan, Emily Suarez, Atticus Shaindlin, Larry McKay, Amanda Ripley and Cate Hayman sing for donations for victims of the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018 on Forbes Avenue in Squirrel Hill. Photo by Shane Dunlap cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 24 height 1731 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.02 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 9:08:40 PM width 2600 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING A police chaplain walks the sidewalk at the scene of a mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Shane Dunlap cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 200 height 1731 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.002 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 7:23:21 PM width 2600 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald and Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto arrive at the scene of a shooting at a synagogue on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 50 height 3280 fnumber 3.2 exposuretime 0.0002 orientation 1 camerasoftware Ver.1.10 originaldate 10/27/2018 3:25:27 PM width 4928 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Police patrol sidewalks on Wilkins Avenue in Squirrel Hill after an fatal shooting on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Shane Dunlap

cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 200 height 1731 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.00125 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 5:19:47 PM width 2600 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Police patrol sidewalks on Wilkins Avenue in Squirrel Hill after an fatal shooting on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Shane Dunlap cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 400 height 1733 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0004 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Ligh originaldate 10/27/2018 4:14:06 PM width 2600 cameramodel NIKON D5 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING A SWAT team member heads towards the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 300 height 3258 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.0002 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 2:47:35 PM width 4561 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING Police officers stand near the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood cameramake NIKON CORPORATION focallength 300 height 2806 fnumber 2.8 exposuretime 0.000125 camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop Came originaldate 10/27/2018 2:47:32 PM width 3928 cameramodel NIKON D4 SQUIRREL HILL SHOOTING SWAT team members heads towards the scene of a mass shooting at a synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Oct. 27, 2018. Photo by Nate Smallwood

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