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In Pittsburgh, Chelsea Clinton tackles issues she says are important to women | TribLIVE.com
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In Pittsburgh, Chelsea Clinton tackles issues she says are important to women

Tom Fontaine
ptrwomen01101516jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Chelsea Clinton campaigns on behalf of her mother, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in an event sponsored by the Pennsylvania Women for Hillary on Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, at the O'Hara Student Center on Pitt's campus.
ptrwomen05101516jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Fans listen to Chelsea Clinton talk while campaigning on behalf of her mother, Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton, in an event sponsored by the Pennsylvania Women for Hillary at the O'Hara Student Center on the University of Pittsburgh campus, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016.
ptrwomen04101516jpg
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Chelsea Clinton campaigns on behalf of her mother, Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton, in an event sponsored by the Pennsylvania Women for Hillary at the O'Hara Student Center on the University of Pittsburgh campus, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016.

Former first daughter Chelsea Clinton headlined a women's rally in Pittsburgh as accusations of sexual misconduct against Donald Trump mounted, but members of a women's group affiliated with the Trump campaign remain committed to the Republican nominee.

“I'm looking at the bigger picture. I'm looking at what is best for this country,” said Joyce Haas of Centre County, co-chair of the Women for Trump Leadership Team that includes representatives statewide.

Haas believes Trump's policies are better for America's future, including women and families.

State Sen. Camera Bartolotta, R-Monongahela, also a member of the Trump women's group, said she was offended by Trump's comments in the recently surfaced video that showed him bragging about groping women. Trump later denied any misconduct. Several women came forward this week with allegations against Trump.

“As a Christian, I have to take him at his word. I just want to stick to the issues,” Bartolotta said, before adding, “I am more appalled at Hillary Clinton's arrogance and entitlement and elitism when it comes to her thinking that she's above the law and rules don't apply to her.”

During a pair of campaign stops Friday in Pittsburgh, Chelsea Clinton, 36, said she has grown accustomed to such vitriol being directed at her mother.

“I don't remember a time in my life when my mother wasn't under attack,” the younger Clinton said, recalling her father's gubernatorial re-election campaign in 1986 when her father's opponent criticized Hillary Clinton for, among other things, “neglecting her daughter because she works so much.”

Chelsea Clinton's first event was dubbed a “Women for Hillary” rally. About 100 people gathered at the Rivers Club in Downtown's One Oxford Centre. Much of the talk focused on family and women's issues, but she was quick to note “any issue we're talking about is really a women's issue,” including policies related to the environment and climate change, the economy and criminal justice reform.

She also criticized Trump's campaign.

“I never thought I would see in my lifetime the type of rhetoric we've heard from Donald Trump and his campaign,” Clinton said, describing some of the talk as sexist, racist, homophobic, Islamophobic and jingoistic. “We have to stand against the normalization of hate speech.”

Tom Fontaine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7847 or [email protected].

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