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John Fetterman raises $100,000 in first week of lt. governor’s campaign | TribLIVE.com
Politics/Election

John Fetterman raises $100,000 in first week of lt. governor’s campaign

Tom Fontaine
| Tuesday, November 21, 2017 11:27 a.m
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Braddock Mayor John Fetterman speaks to supporters and members of the media during a press conference announcing his candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in Braddock on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Braddock Mayor John Fetterman talks to a member of the media prior to the start of a press conference announcing his candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in Braddock on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. Fetterman said rising inequality, partisan extremism and the opioid crisis all were factors in his decision to run.
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters hold signs as Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto introduces Braddock Mayor John Fetterman during a press conference announcing Fetterman's candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in Braddock on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Braddock Mayor John Fetterman speaks to supporters and members of the media during a press conference announcing his candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in Braddock on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.
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Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A child holds an upside down sign supporting Braddock Mayor John Fetterman during a press conference announcing Fetterman's candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in Braddock on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.
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Donald Gilliland | Tribune-Review
Braddock Mayor John Fetterman poses for a photo with an admirer on Monday, July 25, 2016, outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
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Donald Gilliland | Tribune-Review
Braddock Mayor John Fetterman shakes hands with an admirer on Monday, July 25, 2016, at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
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Braddock Mayor John Fetterman

John Fetterman raised $100,000 in the first week of his lieutenant governor’s campaign, according to a campaign announcement, putting the Braddock mayor on pace to potentially raise more than past candidates for the office.

Fetterman, 48, announced last week in Braddock that he is challenging Lt. Gov. Mike Stack in the Democratic primary.

Stack raised about $1.2 million in all of 2014 when he successfully ran for the job. Before that, Jim Cawley raised $550,651 in 2010. Catherine Baker Knoll raised $390,077 in 2006 and $357,650 in 2002, according to Pennsylvania State Department campaign finance records.

Fetterman’s campaign contributions came from 1,500 donors in 52 out of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties, according to a campaign news release.

“John Fetterman is a refreshing candidate for so many folks who are sick of politics as usual,” senior campaign adviser Rebecca Katz said in the release. “We are seeing a wave of enthusiastic support, clearly showing that Pennsylvanians are hungry for a genuine, progressive candidate like John Fetterman.”

Fetterman ran for a U.S. Senate seat last year. He lost the Democratic primary to Chester County’s Katie McGinty but surpassed all polling projections by winning 20 percent of the statewide vote and collecting the most votes in Allegheny County by a wide margin.

Wes Venteicher is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-380-5676, wventeicher@tribweb.com or via Twitter @wesventeicher.

Tom Fontaine is a Tribune-Review staff reporter. You can contact Tom at 412-320-7847, tfontaine@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

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