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Presidents Reagan, Bush acted alone to shield immigrants | TribLIVE.com
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Presidents Reagan, Bush acted alone to shield immigrants

The Associated Press
| Saturday, November 15, 2014 6:54 p.m.
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President Ronald Reagan speaks during a news conference in October 1983 at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo)

WASHINGTON — President Obama’s anticipated order that would shield millions of immigrants now living illegally in the United States from deportation is not without precedent.

Two of the last three Republican presidents — Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush — did the same thing in extending amnesty to family members who were not covered by the last major overhaul of immigration law in 1986.

There was no political explosion then comparable to the one Republicans are threatening now.

The GOP is poised expand his 2-year-old program that shields immigrants brought illegally to this country as children.

“The audacity of this president to think he can completely destroy the rule of law with the stroke of a pen is unfathomable to me,” said Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, an outspoken opponent of relaxing immigration law. “It is unconstitutional, it is cynical, and it violates the will of the American people.”

Such strong feelings are common among congressional Republicans. GOP leaders warn that an executive order from Obama would “poison the well” and severely damage Republicans’ willingness to work with the president during his final two years in office. The GOP vows to erupt if and when Obama follows through on his promise. He wants to extend protection from deportation to millions of immigrant parents and spouses of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, an years in office.

Some have even raised the possibility of impeachment.

Nearly three decades ago, there was barely a peep when Reagan and Bush used their authority to extend amnesty to the spouses and minor children of immigrants covered by the 1986 law.

In 1986, Congress and Reagan enacted a sweeping overhaul that gave legal status to up to 3 million immigrants without authorization to be in the country, if they had come to the United States before 1982. Spouses and children who could not meet that test did not qualify, which incited protests that the new law was breaking up families.

Early efforts in Congress to amend the law to cover family members failed. In 1987, Reagan’s Immigration and Naturalization Service commissioner announced that minor children of parents granted amnesty by the law would get protection from deportation.

Spouses and children of couples in which one parent qualified for amnesty but the other did not remained subject to deportation, leading to efforts to amend the 1986 law.

In a parallel to today, the Senate acted in 1989 to broaden legal status to families, but the House never took up the bill. Through the INS, Bush advanced a new “family fairness” policy that put in place the Senate measure. Congress passed the policy into law by the end of the year as part of broader immigration legislation.

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