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Sears store in Hempfield, Kmart in West View among 80 more slated for closure in 2019 | TribLIVE.com
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Sears store in Hempfield, Kmart in West View among 80 more slated for closure in 2019

Natasha Lindstrom
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Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The New Kensington Kmart is one of several that Sears Holdings, which operates Sears and Kmart stores, will be closing by the end of this year after Sears filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.

Kmart stores in West View and Erie and Sears stores in Hempfield and Altoona will close in March as their cash-strapped parent company teeters on total liquidation.

Employees at 80 stores across the United States learned on Thursday that their retail locations will shutter this spring, on top of more than 200 closures announced by Sears Holdings in recent months, CNBC reports.

The Kmart at West View Shopping Center will be converted into a U-Haul storage and rental facility, as one of 13 properties that Sears sold to U-Haul for $62 million , according to U-Haul and bankruptcy records.

Among the newly announced stores slated for closure in 2019:

  • Sears, 5256 Route 30, Greensburg
  • Sears, 5580 Goods Lane Suite 1005, Altoona
  • Kmart, 996 West View Park Drive, West View
  • Kmart, 2873 W 26th Street, Erie
  • Kmart, 7701 Broadview Road, Cleveland

Liquidation sales are expected to begin at each location in coming weeks.

A Sears Holdings spokesperson could not immediately be reached for comment.

Stores already scheduled to close by the end of the year included Kmarts in Monroeville, New Kensington, Pleasant Hills and Shaler.

RELATED: New Kensington Kmart’s looming closure has shoppers dejected

The few remaining operating stores in Western Pennsylvania include Kmarts in McMurray, New Castle and Allegheny Township.

Sears Holdings, which operates both Sears and Kmart stores, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in mid-October amid financial strain from massive debt and staggering losses.

Kmart alone operated more than 2,100 stores less than 20 years ago.

By October, Sears Holdings operated less than 700 total stores nationwide.

S.S. Kresge, who founded the company in 1897, opened the first store in Memphis under his name. The company continued to grow and in 1962, S.S. Kresge stores rebranded and became Kmart.

Natasha Lindstrom is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Natasha at 412-380-8514, [email protected] or via Twitter @NewsNatasha.

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