Archive

Resurgent Republicans lay the groundwork for gridlock | TribLIVE.com
News

Resurgent Republicans lay the groundwork for gridlock

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Resurgent Republicans rallied yesterday behind an itinerary based on unwavering opposition to the Obama White House and federal spending, laying the groundwork for gridlock until their 2012 goal: a new president, a “better Senate” and ridding the country of that demonized health care law.

Republicans said they were willing to work with President Obama but signaled it would be only on their terms. With control of the White House and the Senate, Democrats showed no sign they were conceding the final two years of Obama’s term to Republican lawmakers who claimed the majority in the House.

“I think this week’s election was a historic rejection of American liberalism and the Obama and Pelosi agenda,” said Rep. Mike Pence, the Indiana Republican who is stepping down from his post in GOP leadership. “The American people are tired of the borrowing, the spending, the bailouts, the takeovers.”

Voters on Tuesday punished Democrats from New Hampshire to California, giving Republicans at least 60 new seats in the House. Republicans picked up 10 governorships; the GOP gained control of 19 state legislative chambers and holds the highest level of state legislative seats since 1928.

“It was a very rough week, there’s no sugarcoating that,” said Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., who led the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

In the days since the election, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has announced her intention to remain as party leader and has yet to draw any challengers. But a race looms between two veteran members of the leadership for the second-ranking spot in the party.

Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina, the whip, has announced his intention to run and reinforced his decision with a letter yesterday evening asking fellow Democrats for their support.

Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the majority leader, has yet to make a formal announcement, but his office circulated a letter signed by 30 rank-and-file Democrats endorsing him for the post. They included liberals as well as moderates, but no members of the Congressional Black Caucus, signaling Hoyer is conceding their votes to Clyburn, the highest-ranking African-American in the House.

“I don’t see any sign of the president retreating from his principles, but I do see his willingness to reach out, and wherever reasonable and in the interests of moving the economy and jobs forward, he’s going to work with the Republicans, as are the Democrats,” Van Hollen said.

Republicans have made clear they plan to work stridently against what they view as a White House out of control and out of touch.

“The president did say this week he’s willing to work with us,” said Rep. Eric Cantor, the Virginia Republican who is in line to become majority leader. “Now listen, are we willing to work with him• First and foremost, we’re not going to be willing to work with him on the expansive liberal agenda he’s been about.”

First target: Democrats’ signature health care law.

“This was a huge, huge issue in the election last Tuesday,” said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. “A vast majority of Americans feel very, very uncomfortable with this new bill. People who supported us, political independents, want it repealed and replaced with something else. I think we owe it to them to try.”

But the reality remains that Republicans do not have enough seats to marshal through a full repeal if Democrats remain steadfast in their support. Even if Republicans were able to sway enough Democrats to support their effort, it would face a certain veto from Obama.

“Admittedly, it will be difficult with him in the White House,” McConnell said. “But if we can put a full repeal on his desk and replace it with the kind of commonsense forms that we were advocating during the debate to reduce spending, we owe it to the American people to do that.”

Rep. Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican who will take leadership of the House budget committee, said the GOP will rein in the overhaul through oversight hearings and cutting off money to implement the law, “but then again, the president has to sign those bills, so that is a challenge.”


TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.