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Rooster rustler nabbed in statue theft, owner of Charleroi store says | TribLIVE.com
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Rooster rustler nabbed in statue theft, owner of Charleroi store says

Tribune-Review
| Saturday, May 10, 2014 9:06 p.m.
GTRchicken511142
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Tim Bradburn, co-owner of Kim's Secret Treasures antique shop in Charleroi, describes the height of one of his several rooster statues on Saturday, May 10, 2014.
GTRchicken511141
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Tim Bradburn, co-owner of Kim's Secret Treasures antique shop, pushes one of his many rooster statues toward the sidewalk on Saturday, May 10, 2014, in Charleroi. Around 3 a.m. Saturday, a man described to be in his 30s stole a similar chicken statue from the shop and broke the legs off in the process of hauling it on his truck. He was later caught by police and owes Bradburn restitution.
GTRchicken511143
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Tim Bradburn, co-owner of Kim's Secret Treasures antique shop in Charleroi, describes the surveillance cameras around his business on Saturday, May 10, 2014.

A Mon Valley man failed to make it down the road with a stolen, 16-foot fiberglass rooster strapped to his truck.

The owner of the purloined poultry said police caught up with the Dodge Ram, even though the driver tried to bolt early Saturday. Charges have not been filed against the suspect, who was not identified.

“I just don’t know how you go on a high-speed chase with a 16-foot rooster,” said Rhonda Jaquay, owner of Kim’s Secret Treasures at 220 McKean Ave. in Charleroi.

Police said it was not too hard to spot the bird with the distinctive red, brown, white and green color scheme, “like the cornflakes,” Jaquay said.

“The police kept calling it a chicken,” she said.

Both legs were broken on the bird, which is worth $2,000, she said.

Jaquay said a neighbor who lives across the street from the shop happened to be awake when the rooster rustler arrived about 3 a.m.

“The neighbor was actually awake this morning, and he saw the rooster in the back, and he saw this guy taking off,” she said.

Jaquay said the neighbor called one of her two sons who lives near the shop.

The tipster heard the commotion as the thief threw the statue in the bed of the truck, so police were immediately alerted.

“He was so bold as to pull over to the side of the road and adjust the straps,”’ said Jaquay of West Mifflin.

Jaquay’s husband and store co-owner Tim Bradburn manned the shop Saturday.

“I can’t imagine being in the police station: heroin there, pot there and then a pair of chicken legs. It was pretty funny,” Bradburn said.

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