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Terminally ill ‘death with dignity’ advocate dies | TribLIVE.com
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Terminally ill ‘death with dignity’ advocate dies

The Associated Press
| Sunday, November 2, 2014 10:21 p.m

PORTLAND, Ore. — A young woman who moved to Oregon to take advantage of the state’s assisted-suicide law took lethal drugs prescribed by a doctor and has died, a spokesman said Sunday.

Brittany Maynard, 29, was diagnosed with brain cancer New Year’s Day and given six months to live.

She and her husband, Dan Diaz, moved from California because that state does not allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with lethal drugs prescribed by a doctor.

Maynard became a nationally recognized advocate for the group Compassion & Choices, which seeks to expand aid-in-dying laws beyond a handful of states.

Sean Crowley, a spokesman for Compassion & Choices, said in a statement that Maynard died Saturday “as she intended — peacefully in her bedroom, in the arms of her loved ones.”

Maynard’s story, accompanied by photos from her pre-illness wedding day, got attention across the globe while igniting a debate about doctor-assisted suicide.

She told reporters she planned to take her life Saturday, less than three weeks before her 30th birthday, but later said she was feeling well enough that she might postpone. She said she wasn’t suicidal but wanted to die on her own terms, and she reserved the right to move the death date forward or push it back.

She said her husband and other relatives accepted her choice.

“I think in the beginning, my family members wanted a miracle; they wanted a cure for my cancer.” she said in early October. “I wanted a cure for my cancer. I still want a cure for my cancer. One does not exist, at least that I’m aware of.

“When we all sat down and looked at the facts, there isn’t a single person that loves me that wishes me more pain and more suffering.”

Oregon was the first state to make it legal for a doctor to prescribe a life-ending drug to a terminally ill patient of sound mind who makes the request.

The patient must swallow the drug without help; it is illegal for a doctor to administer it.

More than 750 people in Oregon used the law to die as of Dec. 31. The median age of the deceased is 71. Only six were younger than 35, like Maynard.

The state does not track how many terminally ill people move to Oregon to die. A patient must prove to a doctor that he or she is living in Oregon.

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