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Eagle Scout project brings fitness equipment to Lower Burrell park | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Eagle Scout project brings fitness equipment to Lower Burrell park

Madasyn Czebiniak

Lower Burrell residents looking to get in shape in the new year can do so for free thanks to one local teenager.

For his Eagle Scout service project, Scott Fennell Jr., 17, of Lower Burrell, built four fitness stations around K-9 Officer Derek Kotecki Memorial Park.

He said he wanted to do something so people of all ages could work out without having to join a gym.

“I’m definitely proud that I got this done,” Fennell said.

Fennell, a member of Troop 134, got the idea for the fitness stations from city officials. He worked closely with Councilman Christopher Koziarski, who oversees parks and public property.

He started his project in the spring of 2017. Adding rubber mulch to the base of the stations is the only work that still needs to be done, and Fennell hopes to complete that in the spring.

The stations cost about $8,000 to build. Donations from local businesses, the city and Fennell’s parents covered the costs.

The Burrell High School junior put in more than 400 service hours — including free time at school and on evenings and weekends — raising money to pay for the project, including designing the stations, hiring contractors, coordinating the work and meeting with other people involved.

In addition to workout equipment, the stations have signs that show what the equipment is meant to be used for. There also is a map that shows where the stations are located around the park.

Mistrik Construction of Tarentum built the stations. Robert T. Villella Sign & Design of Arnold made the signs.

“(Scott) actually spent a lot of time going up and down Leechburg Road, visiting every business,” said Fennell’s mom, Betsy Fennell. “(He) got a lot of solicitations from businesses in Lower Burrell, (and the) New Kensington area.

“He had a couple big donators.”

The stations offer a full-body workout.

The first is for stretching calves and hamstrings. The second is for hand walks and body dips. The third is for stretching and working your core. The fourth is for body raises and pull-ups.

Mayor Rich Callender said the stations will encourage more people to use the park and keep the community more physically fit.

“We had seen a park that had the same type little stations and thought that that would be a great idea for our park,” Callender said. “We have the room. We have the laid-out walking trail already. So putting the stations up was just a matter of somebody volunteering to do that.

“Scott stepped up and did that.”

Koziarski said he was pleased with the project, which is one of the biggest Eagle Scout projects that the city has been involved in.

“The quality of what he’s done is spectacular. I couldn’t be happier,” Koziarski said. “He did a phenomenal job.”

The stations are open for public use. Fennell plans to maintain and care for them long into the future.

“He has promised the city that he will make sure (the stations will) continue to be maintained forever, ” his mother said.

Madasyn Czebiniak is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Madasyn at 724-226-4702, [email protected], or via Twitter @maddyczebstrib.


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Madasyn Czebiniak | Tribune-Review
Boy Scout Scott Fennell shows off how to use one of the four fitness stations he built around K-9 Officer Derek Kotecki Memorial Park for his Eagle Scout project.
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Madasyn Czebiniak | Tribune-Review
Boy Scout Scott Fennell shows off how to use one of the four fitness stations he built around K-9 Officer Derek Kotecki Memorial Park for his Eagle Scout project.
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Madasyn Czebiniak | Tribune-Review
Boy Scout Scott Fennell built fitness stations around K-9 Officer Derek Kotecki Memorial Park for his Eagle Scout project.
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